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  • ALERTA DE VIAJE a México: 10 de enero del 2014

    ALERTA DE VIAJE a México: 10 de enero del 2014

    • The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) in the country. U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by TCOs in various Mexican states. For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.

      This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued July 12, 2013, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

      General Conditions:

      Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day. The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality. Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes. 

        Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter TCOs which engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico. The TCOs themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity. Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere. U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking and highway robbery. While most of those killed in narcotics-related violence have been members of TCOs, innocent persons have also been killed. The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 71 in 2012 and 81 in 2013.

      Gun battles between rival TCOs or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico, especially in the border region. Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs. During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. TCOs have used stolen cars, buses and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable. We recommend that you defer travel to the areas indicated in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the northern border region.

      6.  The number of kidnappings throughout Mexico is of particular concern and appears to be on the rise. According to statistics published by the Mexican Secretaria de Gobernacion (SEGOB), during the first 11 months of 2013 kidnappings nationwide increased 32 percent over the same period in 2012. While kidnappings can occur anywhere, according to SEGOB during this timeframe, the states with the highest numbers of kidnappings were Guerrero, Tamaulipas, Michoacán, Estado de Mexico, and Morelos. Additionally, according to a widely publicized study by the agency responsible for national statistics (INEGI, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography), Mexico suffered an estimated 105,682 kidnappings in 2012; only 1,317 were reported to the police. Police have been implicated in some of these incidents. Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized. Almost 90 kidnappings of U.S. citizens were reported to the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Mexico between April and November of 2013.\U.S. citizens are encouraged to lower their personal profiles and to avoid wearing conspicuous jewelry or clothing bearing logos of U.S. sports teams or military themed apparel that may identify them as U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain awareness of their surroundings and avoid situations in which they may be isolated.

       Kidnappings in Mexico have included traditional, “express” and "virtual" kidnappings. Victims of traditional kidnappings are physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release. “Express” kidnappings are those in which a victim is abducted for a short time and forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released. A “virtual” kidnapping is an extortion by deception scheme wherein a victim is contacted by phone and convinced to isolate themselves from family and friends until a ransom is paid. The victim is coerced (by threat of violence) to remain isolated and to provide phone numbers for the victim's family or loved ones. The victim's family is then contacted and a ransom for the “kidnapped” extracted. Recently, some travelers to Mexico staying at hotels as guests have been targets of such “virtual” kidnapping schemes.

      Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents. Most victims who complied with carjackers’ demands have reported that they were not physically harmed. Carjackers have shot at vehicles that have attempted to flee. Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds. There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs. However, even drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States have been targeted. While violent incidents can occur anywhere and at any time, they most frequently occur at night and on isolated roads. To reduce risk when traveling by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads (“cuotas”) whenever possible.

       The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat the TCOs. U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel. TCOs have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them. You should cooperate at all checkpoints. 

       The Department imposes restrictions on U.S. government employees' travel in Mexico. Since July 2010, USG employees are prohibited from driving on non-official travel from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America. One exception is that personal travel by motor vehicle is permitted on Highway 15 toll road between Hermosillo and Nogales during daylight hours. 

      USG personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which it is advised to “defer non-essential travel”. When travel for official purposes is essential, it is conducted with extensive security precautions. USG personnel and their families are allowed to travel for personal reasons to the areas where no advisory is in effect or where the advisory is to exercise caution. While the general public is not forbidden from visiting places categorized under “defer non-essential travel,” USG personnel will not be able to respond quickly to an emergency situation in those areas due to security precautions that must be taken by USG personnel to travel to those areas. For more information on road safety and crime along Mexico's roadways, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information.

      State-by-State Assessment:

      Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico.  Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, crime and violence can occur anywhere. For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information.    

       Aguascalientes: You should exercise caution when traveling to the areas of the state that border the state of Zacatecas, as TCO activity in that region continues. There is no advisory in effect for daytime travel to the areas of the state that do not border Zacatecas; however, intercity travel at night is not recommended.  

      Baja California: Tijuana, Ensenada and Mexicali are major cities/travel destinations in the state of Baja California - Exercise caution in the northern state of Baja California, particularly at night. There were 458 homicides in Tijuana from October 2012 through September 2013, compared with 324 for the same period a year earlier. Murders in Mexicali declined in the same period from 166 to 132. In the majority of these cases, the killings appeared to be targeted TCO assassinations. Turf battles between criminal groups resulted in assassinations in areas of Tijuana and Mexicali frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents, in which innocent bystanders have been injured, have occurred during daylight hours. 

      Baja California (Sur): Cabo San Lucas and La Paz are major cities/travel destinations in the state of Southern Baja California - No advisory is in effect.

      Campeche: No advisory is in effect.

      Chiapas: San Cristobal de las Casas is a major city/travel destination in Chiapas - No advisory is in effect.

      Chihuahua: Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua City, and Copper Canyon are major cities/travel destinations in Chihuahua - Exercise caution in traveling to the business and shopping districts in the northeast section of Ciudad Juarez and its major industrial parks, and the central downtown section and major industrial parks in Chihuahua City. U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to other areas of these cities and anywhere else in the state of Chihuahua and travel during daylight hours between cities. In Ciudad Juarez, personal travel by USG employees outside the north/central and northeast portion of the city near the Consulate General is restricted and private U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to those areas as well. In Chihuahua City, USG personnel and their family members are permitted to travel only to the central business districts and the city’s airport. Personal vehicular travel during daylight hours by USG personnel and family members is authorized between Ciudad Juarez and Chihuahua using the Highway 45 toll road. Although homicide rates in Ciudad Juarez have decreased markedly from a peak several years ago, the city still has one of the highest homicide rates in Mexico. Crime and violence remain serious problems throughout the state of Chihuahua, particularly in the southern portion of the state and in the Sierra Mountains, including Copper Canyon. U.S. citizens do not, however, appear to be targeted based on their nationality. 

      Coahuila: Defer non-essential travel to the state of Coahuila. The State of Coahuila continues to experience high rates of violent crimes and narcotics-related murders. TCOs continue to compete for territory and coveted border crossings to the United States. Violent crime, including murder, kidnapping, and armed carjacking, continues to be a major concern in the cities of Torreón, Saltillo, Piedras Negras, Ciudad Acuña, and Monclova. Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments, which USG personnel are not permitted to patronize.

      Colima: Manzanillo is a major city/travel destination in Colima - Defer non-essential travel to the areas of the state of Colima that border the state of Michoacán, including the city of Tecoman. Exercise caution when travelling to other parts of the state, including Colima City and Manzanillo. The security situation along the Michoacán border continues to be the most unstable in the state with gun battles occurring between rival criminal groups and with Mexican authorities. Homicides throughout the state totaled 179 in 2012 and 147 for the first ten months of 2013, according to figures from the Colima state government.

      Durango: Defer non-essential travel to the state of Durango, except the city of Durango where you should exercise caution. TCO violence and criminal activity along the highway are continuing security concerns. Several areas in the state continue to experience high rates of violence and remain volatile and unpredictable. The Mexican government deployed troops in March 2013 to quell TCO violence in the La Laguna area, which is comprised of the cities of Gomez Palacio and Lerdo in the state of Durango and the city of Torreon in the state of Coahuila. Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments, which USG personnel are not permitted to patronize. USG personnel may not travel outside the city of Durango and must abide by a curfew of 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. within a secured venue. 

      Estado de Mexico: Toluca and Teotihuacan are major travel destinations in Estado de Mexico - Defer non-essential travel to the municipalities of Coacalco, Ecatepec, Nezahualcoyotl, La Paz, Valle del Chalco, Solidaridad, Chalco, and Ixtapaluca, which are eastern portions of the greater Mexico City metropolitan area, located just to the east of the Federal District of Mexico and Benito Juarez airport, unless traveling directly through the areas on major thoroughfares. These areas have seen high rates of crime and insecurity. You should also defer non-essential travel on any roads between Santa Marta in the southeast portion of the state and Huitzilac in the state of Morelos, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

      Guanajuato: San Miguel de Allende and Leon are major cities/travel destinations in Guanajuato - No advisory is in effect.

      Guerrero: Acapulco, Ixtapa, Taxco and Zihuatanejo are major cities/travel destinations in Guerrero - Defer non-essential travel to the northwestern and southern portions of the state (the area west and south of the town of Arcelia on the border with Estado de Mexico in the north and west and south of the town of Tlapa near the border with Oaxaca), except for the cities of Acapulco, Zihuatanejo, and Ixtapa. In those cities, you should exercise caution and stay within tourist areas. You should also exercise caution and travel only during daylight hours on toll highway ("cuota") 95D between Mexico City and Acapulco. Use the toll road towards the Playa Diamante area and avoid the highway running through the city of Acapulco for travel to and from Acapulco. In Acapulco, defer non-essential travel to areas further than 2 blocks inland of the Costera Miguel Aleman Boulevard, which parallels the popular beach areas. Lodging for USG personnel is limited to the “Hotel Zone” of Acapulco, beginning from the Hotel Avalon Excalibur Acapulco in the north and going south through Puerto Marquez including the Playa Diamante area. Any activity outside the Hotel Zone for USG personnel is limited to the coastal area from La Quebrada to the beginning of the Hotel Zone and only during daylight hours. In general, the popular tourist area of Diamante, just south of the city, has been less affected by violence. Flying into the coastal cities in southern Guerrero remains the preferred method of travel. You should defer non-essential travel by land between Acapulco and Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa, travel to Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa only by air, and exercise caution while in Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa. If traveling by land, use toll highway 200 between Acapulco and Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa. You should also exercise caution in the northern region of Guerrero (the area north of the town of Arcelia on the border with Estado de Mexico in the north and north and east of the town of Tlapa near the border with Oaxaca). The state of Guerrero was the most violent state in Mexico through the first 10 months of 2013, with 1,718 homicides and 205 reported cases of kidnapping, according to the Mexican Secretariado Ejecutivo Nacional de Seguridad Publica. Self-defense groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Armed members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks, and although not considered hostile to foreigners or tourists, are suspicious of outsiders and should be considered volatile and unpredictable.

      Hidalgo: No advisory is in effect.

      Jalisco: Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, and Lake Chapala are major cities/travel destinations in Jalisco - Defer non-essential travel to areas of the state that borders the state of Michoacán and Zacatecas. The security situation along the Michoacán and Zacatecas borders continues to be unstable and gun battles between criminal groups and authorities occur. Concerns include roadblocks placed by individuals posing as police or military personnel and recent gun battles between rival TCOs involving automatic weapons. You should exercise caution in rural areas and when using secondary highways, particularly along the northern border of the state. Except for the areas of the state that border Michoacán, there is no advisory in effect for daytime travel within major population centers or major highways in the state of Jalisco. Intercity travel at night is not recommended. There is no recommendation against travel to Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta. There is also no recommendation against travel on principal highways in Jalisco between Guadalajara including the portions that cross into the southern portions of the state of Nayarit.

      Mexico City (also known as the Federal District): No advisory is in effect. See also the discussion in the section on Estado de Mexico for areas within the greater Mexico City metropolitan area.

      Michoacán: Morelia is a major city/travel destination in Michoacán - Defer non-essential travel to the state of Michoacán except the cities of Morelia and Lázaro Cardenas where you should exercise caution. Flying into Morelia and Lázaro Cardenas is the recommended method of travel. Attacks on Mexican government officials, law enforcement and military personnel, and other incidents of TCO-related violence, have occurred throughout Michoacán. Due to criminal activity in Lazaro Cardenas, in late 2013 the Mexican military assumed direct control of the port. In many areas of the state, self-defense groups operate independently of the government. Armed members of the groups frequently maintain roadblocks, and although not considered hostile to foreigners or tourists, are suspicious of outsiders and should be considered volatile and unpredictable. Groups in Michoacán are reputed to be linked to TCOs.

      Morelos: Cuernavaca is a major city/travel destination in Morelos - Exercise caution in the state of Morelos due to the unpredictable nature of TCO violence. You should also defer non-essential travel on any roads between Huitzilac in the northwest corner of the state and Santa Marta in the state of Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas. On August 24, 2012 two USG employees were injured after being fired upon by Federal Police officers on a non-toll road north of Tres Marias, Morelos. Numerous incidents of narcotics-related violence have also occurred in the city of Cuernavaca.

      Nayarit: Defer non-essential travel to areas of the state of Nayarit that border the states of Sinaloa or Durango, as well as all rural areas and secondary highways. Exercise caution when traveling to the cities of Tepic, Xalisco, or San Blas. There is no recommendation against travel to the Vallarta-Nayarit area in the southern portion of the state also known as the Riviera Nayarit or to principal highways in the southern portion of the state used to travel from Guadalajara to Puerto Vallarta.

      Nuevo Leon: Monterrey is a major city/travel destination in Nuevo Leon - Defer non-essential travel to the state of Nuevo Leon, except the metropolitan area of Monterrey where you should exercise caution. Although the level of TCO violence and general insecurity in Monterrey has decreased within the last 12 months, sporadic gun battles continue to occur in the greater Monterrey area. Adult entertainment establishments and casinos continue to be targets of TCO activity. TCOs have kidnapped, and in some cases murdered U.S. citizens, even when ransom demands are met. TCOs have been known to attack prisons and police stations, and have engaged in public shootouts with the military and between themselves. Pedestrians and innocent bystanders have been killed in these incidents. As a result of a Department of State assessment of the overall security situation, the Consulate General in Monterrey is a partially unaccompanied post with no minor dependents of USG personnel permitted. USG personnel serving at the U.S. Consulate General in Monterrey and their dependents may not frequent casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments. USG personnel and their dependents may not travel outside the San Pedro Garza Garcia municipal boundaries between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., except for travel to the airport after 5 a.m. 

      Oaxaca:
      Oaxaca, Huatulco and Puerto Escondido are major cities/travel destinations in Oaxaca - No advisory is in effect. 

      Puebla: No advisory is in effect.

      Queretaro: No advisory is in effect.

      Quintana Roo: Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Riviera Maya and Tulum are major cities/travel destinations in Quintana Roo - No advisory is in effect.

      San Luis Potosi: Defer non-essential travel to the state of San Luis Potosi, except the city of San Luis Potosi where you should exercise caution. Travel throughout the state remains a concern. TCO violence and criminal activity along highways are continuing security concerns. USG personnel may not frequent casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments. USG personnel may not travel outside the City of San Luis Potosi and must abide by a curfew of 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. within a secured venue.

      Sinaloa: Mazatlan is a major city/travel destination in Sinaloa - Defer non-essential travel to the state of Sinaloa except the city of Mazatlan where you should exercise caution, particularly late at night and in the early morning. One of Mexico's most powerful TCOs is based in the state of Sinaloa, and violent crime rates remain high in many parts of the state. Travel off the toll roads in remote areas of Sinaloa is especially dangerous and should be avoided. We recommend that any travel in Mazatlan be limited to Zona Dorada and the historic town center, as well as direct routes to/from these locations and the airport.

      Sonora: Nogales, Puerto Peñasco, Hermosillo, and San Carlos are major cities/travel destinations in Sonora - Sonora is a key region in the international drug and human trafficking trades, and can be extremely dangerous for travelers. Travelers throughout Sonora are encouraged to limit travel to main roads during daylight hours. The region west of Nogales, east of Sonoyta, and from Caborca north, including the towns of Saric, Tubutama and Altar, and the eastern edge of Sonora bordering Chihuahua, are known centers of illegal activity and non-essential travel between these cities should be avoided. Travelers should also defer non-essential travel to the eastern edge of the State of Sonora which borders the State of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of the northern city of Agua Prieta and the southern town of Alamos), and defer non-essential travel within the city of Ciudad Obregon and south of the city of Navojoa. You should exercise caution while transiting Vicam in southern Sonora due to a roadblock instituted by local indigenous and environmental groups. In December 2013, a gun battle involving Mexican authorities and TCOs occurred in Puerto Penasco. U.S. citizens visiting Puerto Peñasco should remain vigilant, exercise caution and use the Lukeville, Arizona/Sonoyta, Sonora border crossing, in order to limit driving through Mexico.

      Tabasco: Villahermosa is a major city/travel destination in Tabasco - No advisory is in effect.

      Tamaulipas: Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, Reynosa, and Tampico are major cities/travel destinations in Tamaulipas - Defer non-essential travel to the state of Tamaulipas. All USG employees are prohibited from personal travel on Tamaulipas highways outside of Matamoros, Reynosa, and Nuevo Laredo due to the tenuous security situation. In Matamoros, USG employees are subject to further movement restrictions between midnight and 6 a.m. USG employees may not frequent casinos and adult entertainment establishments. Matamoros, Reynosa, Nuevo Laredo, and Ciudad Victoria have experienced grenade attacks in the past year, as well as numerous reported gun battles. Violent gun battles between rival TCO elements and/or the Mexican military can occur in all parts of the region, and at all times of the day. The kidnapping rate for Tamaulipas, the highest for all states in Mexico, more than doubled in 2012 over 2011, and the number of U.S. citizens reported to the consulate as kidnapped in 2013 increased by 75% over 2012. In February 2013, four masked and armed individuals attempted to kidnap a USG employee in Matamoros during daylight hours. All travelers should be aware of the risks posed by armed robbery and carjacking on state highways throughout Tamaulipas, particularly on highways and roads outside of urban areas along the northern border. Traveling outside of cities after dark is particularly dangerous. While no highway routes through Tamaulipas are considered safe, the highways between Matamoros-Tampico, Monterrey-Nuevo Laredo, and Matamoros-Ciudad Victoria are particularly prone to criminal activity. In the past year there have been several instances of U.S. citizens being kidnapped from hotels while attending family or social events (e.g. weddings and funerals). In at least one incident, a member of the traveling party was summoned to the front desk by hotel staff whereupon he was kidnapped. Travelers should consider selecting hotels with adequate security and reputability as well as exercising caution when responding to phone calls or knocks at the door while resident in a hotel. Travelers should stay low-key and refrain from flashing around cash or wearing expensive jewelry.

      Tlaxcala: No advisory is in effect.

      Veracruz: Exercise caution when traveling in the state of Veracruz. The state of Veracruz continues to experience violence among rival criminal organizations. Mexican federal security forces continue to assist state and local security forces in providing security and combating organized crime.

      Yucatan: Merida and Chichen Itza are major cities/travel destinations in Yucatan - No advisory is in effect.

      Zacatecas: Defer non-essential travel to areas of Zacatecas near the border with other Mexican states. Exercise caution in the interior of the state including the city of Zacatecas. The regions bordering Durango and Coahuila as well as the cities of Fresnillo and Fresnillo-Sombrete and surrounding area are particularly dangerous. Robberies, carjackings, and TCO activity remain a concern. Gun battles between criminal groups and authorities have occurred in the area of the state bordering the state of Jalisco. The city of Fresnillo, the area extending northwest from Fresnillo through Durango and into Chihuahua is considered dangerous. Extreme caution should be taken when traveling in the remainder of the state. Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments, which USG personnel may not frequent. USG personnel may not travel outside the City of Zacatecas after dark and must abide by a curfew of 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. within a secured venue.

      Further Information:

       For more detailed information on staying safe in Mexico, please see the State Department's Country Specific Information for Mexico.

      47.  For the latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should regularly monitor the State Department's internet web site, where the current Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, and Travel Alerts can be found. Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well. Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the United States and Canada or, for callers outside the United States and Canada, a regular toll line at 001-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). U.S. citizens traveling or residing overseas are encouraged to enroll with the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program. For any emergencies involving U.S. citizens in Mexico, please contact the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate with responsibility for that person’s location in Mexico. For information on the ten U.S. consular districts in Mexico, complete with links to Embassy and Consulate websites, please consult the Mexico U.S. Consular District map. The numbers provided below for the Embassy and Consulates are available around the clock. The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000. U.S. citizens may also contact the Embassy by e-mail.

      Consulates (with consular districts):

      Ciudad Juarez (Chihuahua): Paseo de la Victoria 3650, tel. (011)(52)(656) 227-3000.

      Guadalajara (Nayarit, Jalisco, Aguas Calientes, and Colima): Progreso 175, telephone (011)(52)(333) 268-2100.

      Hermosillo (Sinaloa and the southern part of the state of Sonora): Avenida Monterrey 141, telephone (011)(52)(662) 289-3500. 


      Matamoros (the southern part of Tamaulipas with the exception of the city of Tampico): Avenida Primera 2002, telephone (011)(52)(868) 812-4402.

      Merida (Campeche, Yucatan, and Quintana Roo): Calle 60 no. 338-K x 29 y 31, Col. Alcala Martin, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico 97050, telephone (011)(52)(999) 942-5700 or 202-250-3711 (U.S. number).

      Monterrey (Nuevo Leon, Durango, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosi, and the southern part of Coahuila): Avenida Constitucion 411 Poniente, telephone (011)(52)(818) 047-3100.

      Nogales (the northern part of Sonora): Calle San Jose, Nogales, Sonora, telephone (011)(52)(631) 311-8150.

      Nuevo Laredo (the northern part of Coahuila and the northwestern part of Tamaulipas): Calle Allende 3330, col. Jardin, telephone (011)(52)(867) 714-0512.

      Tijuana (Baja California Norte and Baja California Sur): Paseo de Las Culturas s/n Mesa de Otay, telephone (011) (52) (664) 977-2000.

       All other Mexican states, the Federal District of Mexico City, and the city of Tampico, Tamaulipas, are part of the Embassy's consular district.  


      Consular Agencies:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14, telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Cancún: Blvd. Kukulcan Km 13 ZH Torre La Europea, Despacho 301 Cancun, Quintana Roo, Mexico C.P. 77500; telephone (011)(52)(998) 883-0272.

      Cozumel: Plaza Villa Mar en el Centro, Plaza Principal, (Parque Juárez between Melgar and 5th Ave.) 2nd floor, locales #8 and 9, telephone (011)(52)(987) 872-4574 or, 202-459-4661 (a U.S. number).

       Los Cabos: Las Tiendas de Palmilla Local B221, Carretera Transpeninsular Km. 27.5, San José del Cabo, BCS, Mexico 23406 Telephone: (624) 143-3566 Fax: (624) 143-6750.

      Mazatlán: Playa Gaviotas #202, Zona Dorada, telephone (011)(52)(669) 916-5889.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcalá no. 407, interior 20, telephone (011)(52)(951) 514-3054, (011) (52)(951) 516-2853.

      Piedras Negras: Abasolo #211, Zona Centro, Piedras Negras, Coah., Tel. (011)(52)(878) 782-5586.

      Playa del Carmen: "The Palapa," Calle 1 Sur, between Avenida 15 and Avenida 20, telephone (011)(52)(984) 873-0303 or 202-370-6708(a U.S. number).

      Puerto Vallarta: Paradise Plaza, Paseo de los Cocoteros #1, Local #4, Interior #17, Nuevo Vallarta, Nayarit, telephone (011)(52)(322) 222-0069.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

  • MENSAJE DE EMERGENCIA-Alerta por Huracán Raymond

    MENSAJE DE EMERGENCIA-Alerta por Huracán Raymond

    • Este mensaje de emergencia es para avisar a los ciudadanos de EE.UU. que se encuentren viajando o viviendo en México  que el Centro Nacional para Huracanes (NHC), www.nhc.noaa.gov, ha emitido una alerta por el Huracán Raymond, que se encuentra actualmente en las costas de Guerrero y Michoacán.

       Raymond es un huracán de categoría 3. De acuerdo con la Comisión Nacional del Agua (http://www.cna.gob.mx/)  desde el 21 de octubre el huracán ha presentado vientos de hasta 125 mph, con ráfagas de hasta 150 mph. Se espera que el sistema de tormentas se mantenga cerca de la costa del Pacífico por las próximas 48 horas, moviéndose lentamente hacia el norte antes de debilitarse. Raymond ya trajo consigo lluvias fuertes y vientos rápidos a la región y esta pronosticada una caída de entre 2 y 4 pulgadas de lluvia con cantidades de hasta 8 pulgadas sobre los estados de  Guerrero y Michoacán. También se esperan lluvias fuertes en Chiapas, Oaxaca, Puebla, Veracruz, Ciudad de México, Estado de México, Guanajuato, Hidalgo, Morelos, Querétaro, San Luis Potosí, Tabasco, Tamaulipas y Tlaxcala. Las clases han sido suspendidas en Guerrero y se han reportado inundaciones en Acapulco e Ixtapa.

      Los viajeros deberán notificar a familiares y amigos de su paradero y permanecer en contacto con el personal de hoteles/ oficiales locales  para instrucciones de evacuación en caso de una emergencia meteorológica.

      Información adicional acerca de preparación en caso de huracanes y tormentas puede ser encontrada en la página del  Buro de Asuntos Consulares Temporada de Huracanes- Infórmese antes de ir.

      Recomendamos que los ciudadanos de EE.UU. viajando o viviendo en México se inscriban en el Programa de Registro de Viajeros (STEP) en www.Travel.State.GovSer parte de STEP te da acceso a las actualizaciones de seguridad  y facilita a la Embajada y Consulados de EE.UU. contactarlo en caso de una emergencia. Si usted no tiene acceso a internet, regístrese directamente con su Embajada o Consulado más cercanos.

      Monitorear de manera regular el sitio web del Departamento de Estado, donde puede encontrar las Alertas y Avisos de Viaje más recientes para México  y a nivel mundial. Lea la Información Especifica por País para México. Para información adicional lea “Un Viaje al Extranjero Seguro”  en la página del Departamento de Estado.

      Contacte a la Embajada de EE.UU. o Consulado para informaciones o restricciones de viaje actualizadas. Usted también puede llamar al 1-888-407-4747 sin costo a los Estados Unidos y a Canadá o al 1-202-501-4444 desde otros países. Estos números están disponibles de 8:00 am a 8:00 pm Horario del Este, de lunes a viernes (excepto días festivos). Síganos en  Twitter y Facebook, baje nuestra aplicación de Smart Traveler para iPhone para tener toda la información a su alcance.

      La Embajada de EE.UU. en la Ciudad de México está ubicada en el Paseo de la Reforma, Colonia Cuauhtémoc, 06500 México, D.F. y está abierta de lunes a viernes de las 8:00 am a las 5:00 pm. Si usted es un ciudadano de EE.UU. en búsqueda de ayuda urgente, el número de emergencia para la Embajada  marcando desde México es (01-55) 5080-2000 y marcando desde los Estados Unidos es 011-52-55-5080-2000.

      La Agencia Consular de Acapulco, una extensión de la Embajada de la Ciudad de México, está ubicada en el Hotel Continental  Emporio en la Costera M. Alemán 121-Oficina 14. La oficina puede ser contactada por teléfono al (52) (744) 481-010; por fax al (52) (744)484-0300 y por correo electrónico a consular@prodigy.net.mx.

  • INFORMACIÓN ESPECIFICA DEL PAÍS MÉXICO- 16 DE OCTUBRE DEL 2013

    INFORMACIÓN ESPECIFICA DEL PAÍS MÉXICO- 16 DE OCTUBRE DEL 2013

    • Descripción del país: México es un país hispano parlante de aproximadamente tres veces el tamaño de Texas, formado por 31 estados y un distrito federal. La capital es la Ciudad de México. El país cuenta con una economía de rápido crecimiento, rankeada por el Banco Mundial como la décimo tercera más grande en el mundo en términos de PIB. El clima varía entre tropical a árido, y el terreno está formado desde tierras bajas costeras hasta mesetas altas, desiertos y montañas de hasta 18 mil pies.

       Muchas ciudades del país son destinos turísticos populares para ciudadanos de EE.UU. y en el 2013 estos siguieron representando la mayor población turista extranjera en visitar México. Los viajeros deberán notar que la información específica por lugar mostrada a continuación no se limita exclusivamente a las ciudades identificadas, sino que puede reflejar condiciones generales a través de todo México. Aunque la mayor parte de los visitantes del país disfrutan completamente su estadía, algunos llegan a experimentar dificultades y serias inconveniencias.

      Por favor lea el reporte completo sobre México del Departamento de Estado

  • Mensaje para Ciudadanos de EE.UU.- 1 de octubre del 2013- Cierre de Agencias Consulares en San Miguel de Allende y Oaxaca.

    Mensaje para Ciudadanos de EE.UU.- 1 de octubre del 2013- Cierre de Agencias Consulares en San Miguel de Allende y Oaxaca.

    • A partir del lunes 7 de octubre del 2013 hasta el jueves 10 de octubre del 2013 las Agencias Consulares de San Miguel de Allende y Oaxaca estarán cerradas al público. Ningún servicio de rutina para ciudadanos americanos será manejado por las oficinas dentro de estas fechas. Para emergencias que involucren a ciudadanos americanos usted puede llamar el conmutador de la Embajada y conectarse con miembros del staff para recibir asistencia.

      Las actividades se reanudaran de manera normal el viernes 11 de octubre del 2013.

      Si usted recibió este correo eso significa que está registrado con nosotros. Aliente a sus familiares y amigos que sean ciudadanos americanos a registrarse con nosotros en https://step.state.gov/step/. Al registrarse, usted nos facilita ponernos en contacto e caso de emergencia.

       La embajada de EE.UU. en la Ciudad de México está ubicada en Paseo de la Reforma 305, Col. Cuauhtémoc.

      06500, México, D.F. El principal número del conmutador (marcando desde Estados Unidos) 011-52-555-080-2000. Para información completa de contacto por favor visite: http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/eacs_hours.html

       La Agencia Consular de San Miguel de Allende está ubicada en Plaza La Luciérnaga, libramiento Juan Manuel Zavala No.165Locales 4 y 5, Colonia La Luciérnaga, San Miguel Allende, Guanajuato, C.P. 37745, Teléfono: 011-52-415-152-2357, celular 011-521-415-113-9574, fax 011-52-415-152-1588, correo electrónico: consuladosma@gmail.com

      La Agencia Consular de Oaxaca está ubicada en Macedonio Alcalá No. 407, Office 20, Oaxaca, Oaxaca, C.P. 68000, Teléfono 011-52-951-514-3054 o 516-2853, fax 011-52-951-516-2701, correo electrónico: conagent@prodigy.net.mx.

      Gracias.

  • Precaución Global- 25 de septiembre del 2013

    Precaución Global- 25 de septiembre del 2013

    • El 25 de septiembre del 2013 el Departamento de Estado de EE.UU. emitió esta precaución global para actualizar la información en la amenaza continua de  acciones terroristas y violencia en contra de los ciudadanos de EE.UU. e interés a través del mundo. Se les recomiendo a los ciudadanos de EE.UU. mantener un alto nivel de vigilancia y de tomar pasos apropiados  para incrementar su consciencia de seguridad. Esto reemplaza la Precaución Global  del 19 de febrero del 2013, para proveer de información actualizada  sobre amenazas de seguridad y actividades terroristas a nivel mundial.

       El Departamento de Estado continúa preocupado con la continua amenaza de ataques terroristas, demostraciones, y otras acciones violentas en contra de los  ciudadanos americanos e intereses de EE.UU.  en el extranjero. Información actual sugiere que Al Qaeda, sus organizaciones asociadas y otros grupos terroristas continúan planeando ataques terroristas en contra de los intereses de EE.UU. en múltiples regiones, incluyendo Europa, Asia, África y el Medio Oriente. Estos ataques pueden emplear una amplia variedad de tácticas incluyendo operaciones suicidas, asesinatos, secuestros  y bombardeos.

      Los extremistas pueden elegir utilizar armas convencionales o poco convencionales, y tomar como blancos tanto intereses oficiales como privados. Ejemplos de dichos blancos incluyen eventos deportivos de alto nivel, áreas residenciales, oficinas, hoteles, clubs, restaurantes, lugares de culto, escuelas, áreas públicas, centros comerciales y otros destinos turísticos tanto en los Estados Unidos como en el extranjero, donde ciudadanos americanos se reúnan en masa; incluyendo días festivos.

       A principios de agosto del 2013, el Departamento de Estado instruyo a ciertas Embajadas y Consulados de EE.UU.  permanecer cerradas o suspender operaciones entre el 4 de agosto y el 10 de agosto debido a la información de seguridad recibida. El gobierno de EE.UU. tomó medidas de precaución como medida de cuidado para los empleados  y demás individuos planeando visitar nuestras instalaciones.

      Se les recuerda a los ciudadanos americanos del peligro potencial de terroristas atacando los sistemas de transporte público y otra infraestructura terrorista. Los extremistas han apuntado e intentado perpetuar ataques a los servicios de metros, ferroviarios, aéreos y marítimos. En el pasado este tipo de ataques han ocurrido en ciudades como Moscú, Londres, Madrid, Glasgow y Nueva York.

       EUROPA: Información actual sugiere que Al Qaeda, organizaciones afiliadas y otros grupos terroristas  continúan planeando ataques en contra de los intereses de EE.UU. y Occidente en Europa. Además hay una amenaza continua en Europa por parte de personas no afiliadas planeando ataques  inspirados por las principales organizaciones terroristas, pero conducidas de manera individual. El primero de febrero del 2013 un individuo detono una bomba en una entrada lateral de la Embajada de EE.UU. en Ankara, matando a un guardia de la Embajada e hiriendo a otros. El Partido Revolucionario de la Liberación del Pueblo / Frente (Devrimci Halk Kurtulus Partisi/Cephesi or DHKP/C) asumió responsabilidad en su página web por el ataque. El DHKP/C ha manifestado sus intenciones de perpetuar más ataques en contra de los Estados Unidos, la OTAN y Turquía. En mayo del 2013 en Londres, dos extremistas musulmanes, sin afiliación a un grupo, mataron a dos soldados británicos. Los gobiernos europeos han tomado acciones para salvaguardarse de los ataques terroristas y algunos han emitido declaraciones oficiales acerca de estas condiciones de amenazas latentes.  En los últimos años, ataques extremistas organizados han sido planeados o llevados a cabo en varios países europeos.  El 5 de febrero, el gobierno búlgaro anuncio su postura frente a la culpabilidad de Hezbollah por un ataque de julio del 2012 en Burgas que resulto en la muerte de cinco turistas y un taxista.

       

      MEDIO ORIENTE Y ÁFRICA DEL NORTE: información confiable indica que grupos terroristas que también buscan continuar ataques en contra de los intereses de EE.UU.  EN EL Medio Oriente y el Norte de África. El gobierno estadounidense está seriamente preocupado por posibles ataques a ciudadanos americanos, instalaciones, negocios e intereses percibidos de EE.UU. y Occidente.  Organizaciones terroristas continúan activas en Yemen, incluyendo Al Qaeda en la Península Arábiga (AQAP). Los niveles de amenazas de seguridad siguen altos en Yemen debido a las actividades terroristas y efervescencia civil. En septiembre del 2012, una multitud de protestantes yemeníes atacó la Embajada de EE.UU. Hay un número de grupos extremistas operando en el Líbano, incluyendo Hezbollah, grupo designado por el gobierno estadounidense como organización terrorista. Iraq está experimentando niveles de violencia no vistos desde el 2007, y Al Qaeda comienza a resurgir en el país.  Aunque los intereses de EE.UU. no han sido atacados directamente, la amenaza de ataque en contra de ciudadanos americanos, incluidos secuestros y ataques terroristas violentos, continúa incluso en la Zona Internacional de Bagdad. Bahréin continúa experimentando brotes de violencia sectaria con insurgentes chiitas conduciendo ataques con bombas molotov en contra del gobierno bahreiní e instalaciones de seguridad. Al Qaeda en el territorio del Magreb Islámico (AQIM) y sus afiliados están activos a lo largo de toda África del Norte. En Argelia los terroristas atacan de manera esporádica  a blancos occidentales y del gobierno argelino, particularmente en la región de Cabilia, y cerca de la frontera de Argelia con Libia y Mali. En enero del 2013, terroristas atacaron una instalación de gas natural en Amenas resultando en la muerte de docenas de personas, incluidos tres ciudadanos americanos. Los terroristas también han atacado plantas de refinación de petróleo en Arabia Saudita y Yemen. El ataque de In Amenas se planeó desde el sur de Libia, que se ha convertido en un refugio para las organizaciones terroristas regionales que representan una amenaza para los intereses de EE.UU. en Trípoli. La seguridad en Libia es provista mayormente por milicias que ocasionalmente pelean entre si y que han demostrado ser incapaces de proteger ciudadanos americanos de ataques pasados, tales como el ataque en contra de las instalaciones de la Misión Temporal de EE.UU. en Bengazi en septiembre del 2012; mismo que culmino en la muerte de cuatro ciudadanos americanos incluido el embajador de EE.UU. en Libia. Algunos elementos en Irán permanecen hostiles a los Estados Unidos, ciudadanos americanos deberán ejercer precaución y estar alertas de que pueda haber mayor agresión por parte del gobierno iraní o actividad terrorista en su contra. El continúo descontento político y social   en Egipto ha ocasionado grandes manifestaciones que se han tornado violentas. Occidentales y ciudadanos americanos se han viso ocasionalmente atrapados en medio de enfrentamientos y manifestaciones. El 28 de junio, un ciudadano americano murió durante una manifestación en Alejandría. El 9 de mayo un civil americano fue atacado con un cuchillo a las afueras de la Embajada de EE.UU. después de ser cuestionado si era americano. El descontento político y social en Tunes también ha desencadenado en grandes manifestaciones que ocasionalmente se vuelven violentas. En septiembre del 2012 un grupo grande de manifestantes irrumpió en la Embajada de EE.UU. en Tunes, causando daño significativo.

       Ninguna parte de Siria debería ser considerada como libre de violencia,  a través de todo el país existe la posibilidad de ataques hostiles e impredecibles, incluyendo secuestro, ataques de francotiradores, bombardeos a pequeña y gran escala, ataques químicos, así como arrestos arbitrarios, detenciones y tortura. El conflicto en Siria ha resultado en decenas de miles de muertes con miles de heridos y más de un millón de personas desplazadas.

      ÁFRICA: Se cree que un número de operativos de Al Qaeda y otros extremistas están operando en y alrededor de África. En febrero del 2012 el emir –designado por EE.UU.- de la Organización de Terrorismo Extranjero al-Shabaab y líder de Al Qaeda, Ayman al-Zahawiri, anunció la alianza de las dos organizaciones. Al-Shabaab ha asumido el crédito por el ataque al centro comercial en Nairobi, Kenia el 21 de septiembre del 2013, que ha cobrado las vidas de más de 60 personas y lastimado a más de 100, incluidos ciudadanos americanos. Los asesinatos, bombardeos suicidas, toma de rehenes y ataques indiscriminados en áreas pobladas por parte de Al-Shabaab también son frecuentes en Somalia. Operativos terroristas y grupos armados en Somalia han demostrado su intención de atacar a las autoridades somalíes, a la Misión de la Unión Africana en Somalia y blancos no militares como oficinas de donativos internacionales y proveedores de ayuda humanitaria. Además, el grupo terrorista de Al Qaeda en territorio del Magreb Islámico (AQIM) ha declarado su intención de atacaran blancos occidentales en el Sahel (área que se extiende cruzando el continente africano entre en Océano Atlántico y el Mar Rojo que incluye Senegal, Mali, Argelia, Níger, Chad, Sudan y Eritrea). Ha asumido responsabilidad por secuestros, intentos de secuestros y el asesinato de varios occidentales en toda la región, incluyendo el sur de Argelia. Amenazas relacionadas con AQIM  en contra de occidentales en Mali y otras partes, aumentaron a raíz del inicio de la intervención francesa (apoyada por Estados Unidos) en el norte y centro de Mali, donde el ambiente de seguridad permanece fluido. En el vecino Níger, terroristas formalmente asociados con la AIQM condujo ataques suicidas  contra a instalaciones mineras francesas y una base militar nigerina en Agadez a finales de mayo. El poco organizado grupo de facciones conocido como Boko Haram continua ataques con bombas molotov y bombardeos suicidas en el norte de Nigeria, principalmente concentrándose en atacar fuerzas gubernamentales y civiles inocentes; los ataques han subido de frecuencia desde el ataque al edificio de Naciones Unidas en la capital de Abuja en 2011. Boko Haram y su grupo faccionario Ansaru también han asumido la responsabilidad por secuestros de varios trabajadores y turistas occidentales, tanto en el norte de Nigeria como en el norte de Camerún. Ansaru ha asesinado virtualmente todos sus rehenes frente a intentos reales o percibidos de rescate, mientras que supuestamente Boko Haram ha recibido un gran pago por liberar una familia francesa secuestrada en un parque para turistas al norte de Camerún. En el 2013, extremistas también se enfocaron nacionales nigerianos y extranjeros involucrados en la erradicación de la polio en el norte de Nigeria. Los extremistas atacaron una escuela en el noreste de Nigeria, matando a más de 40 estudiantes y han llamado a más ataques en contra de instituciones educativas. Varias agencias se han asociadas con el gobierno estadounidense en el campo del desarrollo de la salud publica en el norte de Nigeria, han limitado sus actividades en respuesta a estas amenazas. El presidente de Nigeria ha declarado en estado de emergencia a tres Estados del noreste en respuesta a las actividades de los grupos extremistas.

       Los ciudadanos americanos que estén considerando viajar por mar cerca del Cuerno de África, el Golfo de Guinea o el sur del Mar Rojo deberán  extremar precaución ya que ha habido ataques armados, robos y secuestros en busca de cobrar rescate por parte de piratas. La amenaza de secuestro a las naves mercantes continúa existiendo en aguas territoriales somalíes y hasta mil millas náuticas de la costa de Somalia, Yemen y Kenia en aguas internacionales. También ha ocurrido un aumento en la piratería y el robo armado en el Golfo de Guinea, incluyendo secuestros.

       Las autoridades marítimas estadounidenses avisan a los marineros que eviten el puerto de Mogadiscio y que permanezcan a por lo menos 200 millas náuticas de la costa de Somalia. Además, cuando se transite alrededor del Cuerno de África, el Golfo de Guinea o el Mar Rojo es recomendable que las naves viajen en convoyes y que mantengan una buena comunicación en todo momento. Ciudadanos americanos viajando en naves comerciales de pasajeros deberán consultar con la compañía de crucero o navegación acerca de las precauciones que se deberán tomar para evitar incidentes de secuestro. Las naves comerciales deberán revisar la página del Departamento de Transporte Marítimo  de Administración de la Piratería en el Cuerno de África, para consultar información de avisos marítimos, medidas de auto-protección y fuerzas navales de la región. Revise la Hoja de Dato de piratería en el sur del Mar Rojo, el Golfo de Adén y el Océano Indico.

      SUR DE ASIA: El gobierno estadounidense  continúa recibiendo información acerca de grupos terroristas en el Sur de Asia que podrían estar planeando ataques en la región en contra de instalaciones del gobierno estadounidense, ciudadanos e intereses americanos. La presencia de Al Qaeda, elementos talibanes, Lashkar-eTayyiba, grupos indígenas sectarios y otras organizaciones terroristas, muchas que se encuentran en las listas de Organizaciones Terroristas Extranjeras designadas por EE.UU., presentan un peligro potencial para los ciudadanos americanos en la región. Terroristas y sus simpatizantes han demostrado voluntad y habilidad para atacar lugares donde suelen congregarse o que son visitados por ciudadanos americanos y occidentales. Sus actos pueden incluir, pero no se limitan a ataques con vehículos bomba, ataques con bombas molotov, asesinatos secuestros, ataques con cohetes o asaltos.

       Dichos ataques han ocurrido en varios países del sur asiático, incluyendo Paquistán, donde grupos extremistas continúan enfocándose en ciudadanos e intereses americanos y occidentales, así como al gobierno paquistaní y personal militar/ policiaco. Ataques suicidas continúan ocurriendo en todo el país de manera regular, frecuentemente dirigidos a autoridades gubernamentales  en retenes policiacos o instalaciones militares, así como en áreas públicas como mezquitas o distritos comerciales. Los ciudadanos americanos son secuestrados con mayor frecuencia. Ninguna parte de Afganistán debe ser considerada inmune a la violencia y a través del país existe peligro potencial para ataques hostiles dirigidos o aleatorios a ciudadanos americanos  y otros nacionales occidentales en cualquier momento. Elementos del Talibán y  la red terrorista de Al Qaeda, así como otros grupos insurgentes hostiles al Gobierno de la Republica Islámica de Afganistán  permanecen activos. Los insurgentes continúan dirigiendo ataques a varias instalaciones estadounidenses y del gobierno afgano en Kabul, incluido el ataque del 25 de julio del 2013 en contra de instalaciones de EE.UU.  Adyacentes al Palacio Presidencial y la Embajada de EE.UU. Hay una amenaza latente de secuestro y asesinato de ciudadanos americanos y trabajadores de organizaciones no gubernamentales (NGOs) a lo largo de todo el país. India ha experimentado actividades terroristas e insurgentes que podrían afectar a ciudadanos de EE.UU. directa e indirectamente. Grupos terroristas anti-occidentales, algunos que se encuentran en las listas de Organizaciones Terroristas Extranjeras designadas por EE.UU., han estado activos en la India, incluyendo grupos islamistas extremos como Harkat-ul-Jihad-i-Islami, Harakat ul-Mujahidin, Mujahideen hindúes , Jaish-e-Mohammed, y Lashkar-e Tayyiba con base en Paquistán. Los terroristas han dirigido sus ataques a lugares públicos en la India que además son frecuentados por occidentales, incluyendo hoteles (de lujo y otros), trenes, estaciones de tren, mercados, cines, mezquitas y restaurantes en áreas urbanas grandes.

       Paquistán, India, Afganistán y otros países experimentaron descontento civil, manifestaciones y protestas a gran escala a raíz de la publicación de caricaturas y videos anti-islámicos en septiembre del 2012.

      ASIA CENTRAL: Simpatizantes de grupos terroristas como el Movimiento Islamista de Uzbekistán, Al Qaeda, La Unión Islámica de la Yihad y el Movimiento Oriental del Turkestán siguen activos en Asia central. Estos grupos han expresado sus sentimientos anti-estadounidenses y podrían atentar en contra de los intereses del gobierno de EE.UU.

      Antes de que se Vaya

      El Departamento de Estado insta a los ciudadanos americanos que vivan o planeen viajar al extranjero que se registren en el Programa de Registro de Viajeros (STEP). Cuando usted se enrola en el STEP podemos mantenerlo informado de anuncios importantes relacionados con su seguridad. El registro también le facilitará a la Embajada  contactarlo en caso de emergencia. Usted debe recordar mantener toda su información actualizada en STEP; es particularmente importante cuando se registra o actualiza la información incluir un numero de teléfono vigente y una dirección de correo electrónico.

       Se solicita a los ciudadanos americanos alrededor del mundo permanecer en un estado de alerta. Estas instalaciones pueden ser cerradas de manera temporal  o suspender el servicio al público de manera periódica para evaluar la postura de seguridad. En dichas instancias, las Embajadas y Consulados de EE.UU. harán todos los esfuerzos posibles para proveer  servicios de emergencia a los ciudadanos americanos. Se les pide a los ciudadanos americanos en el extranjero monitorear las noticias locales y mantener contacto con la Embajada o Consulado de EE.UU. más cercanos.

      A medida que el Departamento de Estado continua desarrollando la información de posibles amenazas a la seguridad de los ciudadanos americanos en el extranjero, comparte información confiable a través de los documentos del Programa de información Consular, incluyendo Alertas y Avisos de Viaje, información Específica por País, y los mensajes de Emergencia y Seguridad. Todos estos están disponibles en la página del Buro de Asuntos Consulares en http://travel.state.gov. Manténgase informado incluyendo nuestra página web dentro de sus favoritos o bajando nuestra aplicación de Smart Traveler para iPhone o la aplicación de Google Play para obtener información oportuna de viaje en todo momento.  Síganos en Twitter y en la página de Facebook del Buro de Asuntos Consulares.  

       

       Además de la información encontrada en internet, los viajeros podrán obtener información actualizada acerca de las condiciones de seguridad llamando al 1-888-407-4747 sin costo desde los Estados Unidos y Canadá o desde otros países al 1-202-501-4444. Estos números están disponibles de las 8:00 am a las 8:00 pm   de lunes a viernes, horario del Este (excepto en los días festivos federales de EE.UU.).

  • Mensaje para Ciudadanos Americanos-24 de septiembre del 2013

    Mensaje para Ciudadanos Americanos-24 de septiembre del 2013

    • Dear U.S. citizens:

      From Monday, September 30, 2013 through Thursday, October 3, 2013 the Acapulco Consular Agency will be closed to the public.  No routine U.S. citizenservices will be handled at our office on this date.  For emergencies involving U.S. citizens you may call the Embassy switchboard (see below) and be connected to a staff member for assistance.

      We will resume normal operations on Friday, October 4, 2013. 

      If you received this email it means you are registered with us!  Encourage your American friends, family, neighbors, and others you know to register at https://step.state.gov/step/.  By registering, you make it easier for us to contact you in case of an emergency.

      The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City is located at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Col. Cuauhtemoc

      06500, Mexico, D.F.  The main switchboard phone number is (dialing from the United States) 011-52-555-080-2000.  For full contact information please visit http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/eacs_hours.html

      The Acapulco Consular Agency is located at the Hotel Continental Emporio, Costera M. Alemán 121 - Office 14, Acapulco, Guerrero, C.P. 39670, office phone 011-52-744-481-0100, phone/fax: 011-52-744-484-0300, e-mail: consular@prodigy.net.mx

      Thank you.

  • Mensaje de Emergencia- Huracán Ingrid y Tormenta Tropical Manuel -15 de septiembre del 2013

    Mensaje de Emergencia- Huracán Ingrid y Tormenta Tropical Manuel -15 de septiembre del 2013

    • This emergency message is being issued to alert U.S. citizens residing and traveling in Mexico that the National Hurricane Center (NHC), www.nhc.noaa.gov/, has issued a warning for Hurricane Ingrid, currently located in the Gulf of Mexico on the eastern coast of Mexico near the states of Tamaulipas and Veracruz.  According to Mexico’s La Comisión Nacional del Agua (CNA), www.cna.gob.mx, Ingrid is expected to make landfall Monday on the coasts north of Veracruz and south of Tamaulipas. From there, Ingrid is expected to move inland towards San Luis Potosi.  Ingrid is expected to produce torrential rains of 10 to 15 inches over a large part of eastern Mexico.  Isolated amounts of 25 inches of rain are also possible. These rains are likely to result in life-threatening flash floods and mud slides, especially in regions of mountainous terrain. El Servicio Meteorológico Nacional of Mexico (SMN), www.smn.cna.gob.mex, recommends that people residing in the coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico and areas in eastern Mexico take precautions against the effects of rain, strong winds, and large and destructive waves. 

      Separately, the Government of Mexico has issued a tropical storm watch for Tropical Storm Manuel.  Currently, Manuel is moving towards the southwestern coast of Mexico and is likely to make landfall late on Sept. 15. Manuel is expected to produce torrential rains of 5 to 15 inches in the states of Guerrero, Michoacán, Colima, Jalisco, Nayarit, Zacatecas, Guanajuato, Queretaro, Mexico State, Distrito Federal, Morelos, and Oaxaca. Isolated amounts of 25 inches of rain are also possible. These rains are likely to result in life-threatening flash floods and mud slides, especially in regions of mountainous terrain. El Servicio Meteorológico Nacional of Mexico (SMN), www.smn.cna.gob.mex, recommends that people residing in the above-mentioned states take precautions against the effects of rain, strong winds, and large and destructive waves. 

      U.S. citizens should monitor local radio, local media, and the National Weather Service and Servicio Meteorológico Nacional to stay aware of area weather developments.  Minor tropical storms can develop into hurricanes very quickly, limiting the time available for a safe evacuation.  Travelers should apprise family and friends of their whereabouts and remain in close contact with hotel staff and/or local officials for evacuation instructions in a weather emergency.

      In the aftermath of some previous storms, U.S. citizens traveling abroad have encountered uncomfortable and often dangerous conditions that have lasted for several days while awaiting transportation back to the United States.  In the past, many U.S. citizens have been forced to delay travel due to infrastructure damage to airports and limited flight availability.  Roads were also washed out or obstructed by debris, adversely affecting access to airports and land routes out of affected areas.  Reports of looting and sporadic violence in the aftermath of natural disasters are not uncommon.  Security personnel may not be readily available to assist at all times.  In the event of a hurricane, travelers should be aware that they may not be able to depart the area for 24-48 hours or longer. 

      Additional information on hurricanes and storm preparedness may be found on the Bureau of Consular Affairs' Hurricane Season - Know Before You Go webpage: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis_pa_tw_2915.html 

      We strongly encourage U.S. citizens to enroll with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the Department of State's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) website at https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/ui/.  By enrolling, you will receive the most recent security and safety updates during your trip.  Enrollment also ensures that you can be reached during an emergency.  While we will do our utmost to assist you in a crisis, be aware that local authorities bear primary responsibility for the welfare of people living or traveling in their jurisdictions.

  • Mensaje de Emergencia-Aviso tras daños por Huracán -20 de septiembre del 2013

    Mensaje de Emergencia-Aviso tras daños por Huracán -20 de septiembre del 2013

    • This message provides an update on the evolving extreme weather conditions in Mexico and follows the emergency message released September 15, 2013.  Since that time, Manuel grew from a tropical storm to a hurricane and then weakened to a tropical rainstorm on its path northward along the western Mexican coast.

      Full text

  • Clausura de Servicios de Agencia Consular de Ixtapa

    Clausura de Servicios de Agencia Consular de Ixtapa

    • Effective August 1st 2013, U.S. Consular Agency Ixtapa will no longer accept U.S. passport, Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA), or notary applications or appointments.  For these services please consult the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City or visit the U.S. Consular Agency in Acapulco:


      Hotel Continental Emporio, Costera M. Alemán 121 - Office 14, Acapulco, Gro. 39670
      Monday-Friday: 10:00am - 2:00pm
      Office: [52] (744) 481-0100
      Phone/Fax: [52] (744) 484-0300
      E-Mail: consular@prodigy.net.mx


      FOR EMERGENCY SERVICES, PLEASE CALL THE US EMBASSY AT 01-55-5080-2000

  • Alerta de Viaje para México, Julio 2013

    Alerta de Viaje para México, Julio 2013

    • The Department of State has issued this Travel Warning to inform U.S. citizens about the security situation in Mexico. General information on the overall security situation is provided immediately below. For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.

      This Travel Warning supersedes the Travel Warning for Mexico dated November 20, 2012 to consolidate and update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

      General Conditions:

      Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day. More than 20 million U.S. citizens visited Mexico in 2012. The Mexican government makes a considerable effort to protect U.S. citizens and other visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) have targeted U.S. visitors and residents based on their nationality. Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that is reported in the border region and in areas along major trafficking routes.

      Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter TCOs which engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico. The TCOs themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity. Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere. U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking and highway robbery. While most of those killed in narcotics-related violence have been members of TCOs, innocent persons have also been killed. The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 113 in 2011 and 71 in 2012.

      Gun battles between rival TCOs or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico, especially in the border region. Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs. During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. TCOs have used stolen cars, buses and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable. We recommend that you defer travel to the areas indicated in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the northern border region.

      The number of kidnappings and disappearances throughout Mexico is of particular concern. Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized. In addition, local police have been implicated in some of these incidents. We strongly advise you to lower your profile and avoid displaying any evidence of wealth that might draw attention. 

      Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents. Most victims who complied with carjackers at these checkpoints have reported that they were not physically harmed. Carjackers have shot at vehicles that fail to stop at checkpoints. Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop and running vehicles off the road at high speeds. There are some indications that criminals have particularly targeted newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs. However, victims driving a variety of vehicles, from late model SUVs to old sedans have also been targeted. While violent incidents have occurred at all hours of the day and night on both modern toll highways ("cuotas") and on secondary roads, they have occurred most frequently at night and on isolated roads. To reduce risk, if absolutely necessary to travel by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads whenever possible. The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat the TCOs. U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways may encounter government checkpoints, which are often staffed by military personnel or law enforcement personnel. TCOs have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them. You should cooperate at all checkpoints.

      The U.S. Mission in Mexico imposes restrictions on U.S. government employees' (U.S. citizens working at the Embassy and the nine consulates throughout Mexico) travel that have been in place since July 15, 2010. USG employees and their families are not permitted to drive for personal reasons from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America. Personal travel by vehicle is permitted between Hermosillo and Nogales but is restricted to daylight hours and the Highway 15 toll road ("cuota"). 

      USG personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which it is advised to“defer non-essential travel”. When travel for official purposes is essential, it is conducted with extensive security precautions. USG personnel and their families are allowed to travel for personal reasons to the areas where no advisory is in effect or where the advisory is to exercise caution. While the general public is not forbidden from visiting places categorized under “defer non-essential travel,” USG personnel will not be able to respond quickly to an emergency situation in those areas due to security precautions that must be taken by USG personnel to travel to those areas.

      For more information on road safety and crime along Mexico's roadways, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information.

      State-by-State Assessment:

      Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico. The accompanying map will help in identifying individual locations. Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, crime and violence can occur anywhere. For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information.   

      Aguascalientes: You should exercise caution when traveling to the areas of the state that border the state of Zacatecas, as TCO activity in that region continues. There is no advisory in effect for daytime travel to the areas of the state that do not border Zacatecas; however, intercity travel at night is not recommended.  

      Baja California (north): Tijuana, Ensenada and Mexicali are major cities/travel destinations in the state of Baja California - see map to identify their exact locations: You should exercise caution in the northern state of Baja California, particularly at night. There were 278 homicides in Tijuana from January to June 2013. Mexicali’s murder rate has climbed from 14.3 per 100,000 in 2011 to 15.8 per 100,000 in 2012. In the majority of these cases, the killings appeared to be targeted TCO assassinations. Turf battles between criminal groups resulted in some assassinations in areas of Tijuana and Mexicali frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents, in which innocent bystanders have been injured, have occurred during daylight hours. 

      Baja California (South): Cabo San Lucas and La Paz are major cities/travel destinations in the state of Southern Baja California - see map to identify its exact location: No advisory is in effect.

      Campeche: No advisory is in effect.

      Chiapas: San Cristobal de las Casas is a major city/travel destination in Chiapas - see map to identify its exact location: No advisory is in effect.

      Chihuahua: Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua City, and Copper Canyon are major cities/travel destinations in Chihuahua - see map to identify their exact locations: You should defer non-essential travel to the state of Chihuahua. In Ciudad Juarez, personal travel by USG employees outside the northeast portion of the city (the area near the Consulate General) is restricted. Although homicides have decreased markedly—from a high of 3,100 homicides in 3010 to 749 in 2012—Ciudad Juarez still has one of the highest homicide rates in Mexico. Crime and violence remain serious problems throughout the state of Chihuahua, particularly in the southern portion of the state and in the Sierra Mountains, including Copper Canyon. U.S. citizens do not, however, appear to be targeted based on their nationality. 

      Coahuila: You should defer non-essential travel to the state of Coahuila. The State of Coahuila continues to experience high rates of violent crimes and narcotics-related murders. TCOs continue to compete for territory and coveted border crossings to the United States. The cities of Torreón, Saltillo, Piedras Negras, and Ciudad Acuña have seen an increase of violent crimes within the last six months, including murder, kidnapping, and armed carjacking. Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments, which USG personnel are not permitted to frequent.

      Colima: Manzanillo is a major city/travel destination in Colima - see map to identify its exact location: You should defer non-essential travel to the areas of the state of Colima that border the state of Michoacán, including the city of Tecoman. You should also exercise caution when travelling to other parts of the state, including Colima City and Manzanillo. The security situation along the Michoacan border continues to be the most unstable in the state with gun battles occurring between rival criminal groups and with Mexican authorities. Homicides throughout the state rose sharply from 113 in 2011 to 179 in 2012, according to official Mexican government sources.

      Durango: You should defer non-essential travel to the state of Durango, except the city of Durango where you should exercise caution. Cartel violence and highway lawlessness are a continuing security concern. Several areas in the state continue to experience high rates of violence and remain volatile and unpredictable. The Mexican government deployed troops in March 2013 to quell TCO violence in the La Laguna area, which is comprised of the cities of Gomez Palacio and Lerdo in the state of Durango and the city of Torreon in the state of Coahuila. Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments, which USG personnel are not permitted to frequent. USG personnel may not travel outside the city of Durango and must abide by a curfew of 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. within a secured venue.

      Estado de Mexico: Toluca and Teotihuacan are major travel destinations in Estado de Mexico - see map to identify exact locations: You should defer non-essential travel to the municipalities of Coacalco, Ecatepec, Nezahualcoyotl, La Paz, Valle del Chalco, Solidaridad, Chalco, and Ixtapaluca, which are eastern portions of the greater Mexico City metropolitan area, located just to the east of the Federal District of Mexico and Benito Juarez airport, unless traveling directly through the areas on major thoroughfares. These areas have seen high rates of crime and insecurity. You should also defer non-essential travel on any roads between Santa Marta in the southeast portion of the state and Huitzilac in the state of Morelos, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

      Guanajuato: San Miguel de Allende and Leon are major cities/travel destinations in Guanajuato - see map to identify their exact locations: No advisory is in effect.

      Guerrero: Acapulco, Ixtapa, Taxco and Zihuatanejo are major cities/travel destinations in Guerrero - see map to identify their exact locations: You should defer non-essential travel to the northwestern and southern portions of the state (the area west and south of the town of Arcelia on the border with Estado de Mexico in the north and the town of Tlapa near the border with Oaxaca), except for the cities of Acapulco, Zihuatanejo, and Ixtapa. In those cities, you should exercise caution and stay within tourist areas. You should also exercise caution and travel only during daylight hours on toll highway ("cuota") 95D between Mexico City and Acapulco and highway 200 between Acapulco and Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa. In Acapulco, defer non-essential travel to areas further than 2 blocks inland of the Costera Miguel Aleman Boulevard, which parallels the popular beach areas. Lodging for USG personnel is limited to the “Hotel Zone” of Acapulco, beginning from the Hotel Avalon Excalibur Acapulco in the north and going south through Puerto Marquez including the Playa Diamante area. Any activity outside the Hotel Zone for USG personnel is limited to the coastal area from La Quebrada to the beginning of the Hotel Zone and only during daylight hours. In general, the popular tourist area of Diamante, just south of the city, has been less affected by violence. Flying into the coastal cities in southern Guerrero remains the preferred method of travel. You should defer non-essential travel by land between Acapulco and Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa, travel to Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa only by air, and exercise caution while in Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa. If travelling by automobile between Mexico City and Acapulco you should exercise caution and travel only during daylight hours on toll highway ("cuota") 95D, staying on the toll road towards the Playa Diamante area and avoiding the highway running through the city of Acapulco. You should also exercise caution in the northern region of Guerrero (the area north of the town of Arcelia on the border with Estado de Mexico in the north and the town of Tlapa near the border with Oaxaca). The state of Guerrero has seen an increase in violence among rival criminal organizations. Acapulco's murder rates increased dramatically since 2009; in response, in 2011 the Government of Mexico sent additional military and federal police to the state to assist State security forces in implementing ongoing operation “Guerrero Seguro” (Secure Guerrero) that focuses on combating organized crime and returning security to the environs of popular tourist areas. Self-defense groups operate independently of the government in the Costa Chica region of eastern Guerrero. Armed members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks, and although not considered hostile to foreigners or tourists, are suspicious of outsiders and should be considered volatile and unpredictable.

      Hidalgo: No advisory is in effect.

      Jalisco: Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, and Lake Chapala are major cities/travel destinations in Jalisco - see map to identify their exact locations: You should defer non-essential travel to areas of the state that borders the state of Michoacán. The security situation along the Michoacán and Zacatecas borders continues to be unstable and gun battles between criminal groups and authorities occur. Concerns include roadblocks placed by individuals posing as police or military personnel and recent gun battles between rival TCOs involving automatic weapons.  You should exercise caution in rural areas and when using secondary highways, particularly along the northern border of the state. Except for the areas of the state that border Michoacan, there is no advisory in effect for daytime travel within major population centers or major highways in the state of Jalisco. Intercity travel at night is not recommended. There is no recommendation against travel to Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta. There is also no recommendation against travel on principal highways in Jalisco between Guadalajara including the portions that cross in to the southern portions of the state of Nayarit.

      Mexico City (also known as the Federal District): No advisory is in effect. See also the discussion in the section on Estado de Mexico for areas within the greater Mexico City metropolitan area.

      Michoacán: Morelia is a major city/travel destination in Michoacán - see map to identify exact locations: You should defer non-essential travel to the state of Michoacán except the cities of Morelia and Lázaro Cardenas where you should exercise caution. Flying into Morelia and Lázaro Cardenas is the recommended method of travel. Attacks on Mexican government officials, law enforcement and military personnel, and other incidents of TCO-related violence, have occurred throughout Michoacán. In the northwestern portion of the state, self-defense groups operate independently of the government. Armed members of the groups frequently maintain roadblocks, and although not considered hostile to foreigners or tourists, are suspicious of outsiders and should be considered volatile and unpredictable. Groups in Michoacan are reputed to be linked to TCOs.

      Morelos: Cuernavaca is a major city/travel destination in Morelos - see attached map to identify their exact locations: You should exercise caution in the state of Morelos due to the unpredictable nature of TCO violence. You should also defer non-essential travel on any roads between Huitzilac in the northwest corner of the state and Santa Marta in the state of Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas. On August 24, 2012 two USG employees were injured after being fired upon by Federal Police officers on an isolated road north of Tres Marias, Morelos. Numerous incidents of narcotics-related violence have also occurred in the city of Cuernavaca.

      Nayarit: You should defer non-essential travel to areas of the state of Nayarit that border the states of Sinaloa or Durango, as well as all rural areas and secondary highways. You should exercise caution when traveling to the cities of Tepic, Xalisco, or San Blas. There is no recommendation against travel to the Vallarta-Nayarit area in the southern portion of the state also known as the Riviera Nayarit or to principal highways in the southern portion of the state used to travel from Guadalajara to Puerto Vallarta.

      Nuevo Leon: Monterrey is a major city/travel destination in Nuevo Leon- see map to identify its exact location: You should defer non-essential travel to the state of Nuevo Leon, except the metropolitan area of Monterrey where you should exercise caution. Although the level of TCO violence and general insecurity in Monterrey has decreased within the last 12 months, sporadic gun battles continue to occur in the greater Monterrey area. Adult entertainment establishments and casinos continue to be targets of TCO activity. TCOs have kidnapped, and in some cases murdered American citizens, even when ransom demands are met. TCOs have been known to attack local government facilities, prisons and police stations, and are engaged in public shootouts with the military and between themselves. TCOs have used vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices against military and law enforcement units as well as incendiary devices against several types of businesses. Pedestrians and innocent bystanders have been killed in these incidents. Local police and private patrols have limited capacity to deter criminal elements or respond effectively to security incidents. As a result of a Department of State assessment of the overall security situation, the Consulate General in Monterrey is a partially unaccompanied post with no minor dependents of USG personnel permitted. USG personnel serving at the U.S. Consulate General in Monterrey may not frequent casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments. USG personnel may not travel outside the San Pedro Garza Garcia municipal boundaries between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., except for travel to the airport after 5 a.m. 

      Oaxaca: Oaxaca, Huatulco and Puerto Escondido are major cities/travel destinations in Oaxaca - see map to identify their exact locations: No advisory is in effect.

      Puebla: No advisory is in effect.

      Queretaro: No advisory is in effect.

      Quintana Roo: Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Riviera Maya and Tulum are major cities/travel destinations in Quintana Roo - see attached map to identify their exact locations: No advisory is in effect.

      San Luis Potosi: You should defer non-essential travel to the state of San Luis Potosi, except the city of San Luis Potosi where you should exercise caution. The entire stretch of highway 57D in San Luis Potosi and portions of the state east of highway 57D towards Tamaulipas are particularly dangerous. A USG employee was killed and another wounded when they were attacked in their U.S. government vehicle on Highway 57 near Santa Maria del Rio in 2011. Cartel violence and highway lawlessness are a continuing security concern. USG personnel may not frequent casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments. USG personnel may not travel outside the City of San Luis Potosi and must abide by a curfew of 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. within a secured venue.

      Sinaloa: Mazatlanis a major city/travel destination in Sinaloa - see map to identify its exact location: You should defer non-essential travel to the state of Sinaloa except the city of Mazatlan where you should exercise caution, particularly late at night and in the early morning. One of Mexico's most powerful TCOs is based in the state of Sinaloa. With the exception of Ciudad Juarez, since 2006 more homicides have occurred in the state's capital city of Culiacan than in any other city in Mexico. Travel off the toll roads ("cuotas") in remote areas of Sinaloa is especially dangerous and should be avoided. We recommend that any travel in Mazatlan be limited to Zona Dorada and the historic town center, as well as direct routes to/from these locations and the airport.

      Sonora: Nogales, Puerto Peñasco, Hermosillo, and San Carlos are major cities/travel destinations in Sonora - see map to identify their exact locations: U.S. citizens visiting Puerto Peñasco should exercise caution and use the Lukeville, Arizona/Sonoyta, Sonora border crossing, in order to limit driving through Mexico. You should defer non-essential travel between the city of Nogales and the cities of Sonoyta and Caborca (which area also includes the smaller cities of Saric, Tubutama, and Altar), defer non-essential travel to the eastern edge of the State of Sonora which borders the State of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of the northern city of Agua Prieta and the southern town of Alamos), and defer non-essential travel within the city of Ciudad Obregon and southward with the exception of travel to Alamos (traveling only during daylight hours and using only the Highway 15 toll road, or "cuota", and Sonora State Road 162). Sonora is a key region in the international drug and human trafficking trades, and can be extremely dangerous for travelers. The region west of Nogales, east of Sonoyta, and from Caborca north, including the towns of Saric, Tubutama and Altar, and the eastern edge of Sonora bordering Chihuahua, are known centers of illegal activity. Travelers throughout Sonora are encouraged to limit travel to main roads during daylight hours.

      Tabasco: Villahermosa is a major city/travel destination in Tabasco -see attached map to identify its exact location: No advisory is in effect.

      Tamaulipas: Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, Reynosa, and Tampico are major cities/travel destinations in Tamaulipas - see map to identify their exact locations: You should defer non-essential travel to the state of Tamaulipas. All USG employees are prohibited from personal travel on Tamaulipas highways outside of Matamoros and Nuevo Laredo due to the tenuous security situation. In Matamoros, USG employees are subject to further movement restrictions between midnight and 6 a.m. USG employees may not frequent casinos and adult entertainment establishments. Matamoros, Reynosa, Nuevo Laredo, and Ciudad Victoria have experienced grenade attacks in the past year, as well as numerous reported gun battles. Nuevo Laredo has seen a marked increase in the number of murders, carjackings, and robberies in the past year. For example, the numbers of murders are up 92.5% over last year. These crimes occur in all parts of the city at all times of the day. The kidnapping rate for Tamaulipas, the highest for all states in Mexico, more than doubled in the past year. In February 2013, four masked and armed individuals attempted to kidnap a USG employee in Matamoros during daylight hours. All travelers should be aware of the risks posed by armed robbery and carjacking on state highways throughout Tamaulipas, particularly on highways and roads outside of urban areas along the northern border. Traveling outside of cities after dark is particularly dangerous. While no highway routes through Tamaulipas are considered safe, many of the crimes reported to the U.S. Consulate General in Matamoros have taken place along the Matamoros-Tampico highway.

      Tlaxcala: No advisory is in effect.

      Veracruz: You should exercise caution when traveling in the state of Veracruz. The state of Veracruz continues to experience violence among rival criminal organizations. Mexican federal security forces continue to assist state and local security forces in providing security and combating organized crime. 

      Yucatan: Merida and Chichen Itza are major cities/travel destinations in Yucatan -see map to identify its exact location: No advisory is in effect.

      Zacatecas: You should defer non-essential travel within the state of Zacatecas to the area bordering the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Durango, and Jalisco and exercise caution in the interior of the state including the city of Zacatecas. The regions of the state bordering Durango and Coahuila as well as the cities of Fresnillo and Fresnillo-Sombrete and surrounding area are particularly dangerous. The northwestern portion of the state of Zacatecas has become notably dangerous and insecure. Robberies and carjackings are occurring with increased frequency and both local authorities and residents have reported a surge in observed TCO activity. This area is remote, and local authorities are unable to regularly patrol it or quickly respond to incidents that occur there. Gun battles between criminal groups and authorities occur in the area of the state bordering the state of Jalisco. There have also been reports of roadblocks and false checkpoints on highways between the states of Zacatecas and Jalisco. The city of Fresnillo, the area extending northwest from Fresnillo along Highway 45 (Fresnillo-Sombrete) between Highways 44 and 49, and highway 49 northwards from Fresnillo through Durango and in to Chihuahua are considered dangerous. Extreme caution should be taken when traveling in the remainder of the state. Of particular safety concern are casinos, sportsbooks, or other gambling establishments and adult entertainment establishments, which USG personnel may not frequent. USG personnel may not travel outside the City of Zacatecas after dark and must abide by a curfew of 1 a.m to 6 a.m. within a secured venue.

      Further Information

      For more detailed information on staying safe in Mexico, please see the State Department's Country Specific Information for Mexico.

      For the latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should regularly monitor the State Department's internet web site, where the current Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, and Travel Alerts can be found. Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well. Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the United States and Canada or, for callers outside the United States and Canada, a regular toll line at 001-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). U.S. citizens traveling or residing overseas are encouraged to enroll with the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program. For any emergencies involving U.S. citizens in Mexico, please contact the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate with responsibility for that person’s location in Mexico. For information on the ten U.S. consular districts in Mexico, complete with links to Embassy and Consulate websites, please consult the Mexico U.S. Consular District map. The numbers provided below for the Embassy and Consulates are available around the clock. The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000. U.S. citizens may also contact the Embassy by e-mail.

      Consulates (with consular districts):

      • Ciudad Juarez (Chihuahua): Paseo de la Victoria 3650, tel. (011)(52)(656) 227-3000.
      • Guadalajara (Nayarit, Jalisco, Aguas Calientes, and Colima): Progreso 175, telephone (011)(52)(333) 268-2100.
      • Hermosillo (Sinaloa and the southern part of the state of Sonora): Avenida Monterrey 141, telephone (011)(52)(662) 289-3500.
      • Matamoros (the southern part of Tamaulipas with the exception of the city of Tampico): Avenida Primera 2002, telephone (011)(52)(868) 812-4402.
      • Merida (Campeche, Yucatan, and Quintana Roo): Calle 60 no. 338-K x 29 y 31, Col. Alcala Martin, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico 97050, telephone (011)(52)(999) 942-5700 or 202-250-3711 (U.S. number).
      • Monterrey (Nuevo Leon, Durango, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosi, and the southern part of Coahuila): Avenida Constitucion 411 Poniente, telephone (011)(52)(818) 047-3100.
      • Nogales (the northern part of Sonora): Calle San Jose, Nogales, Sonora, telephone (011)(52)(631) 311-8150.
      • Nuevo Laredo (the northern part of Coahuila and the northwestern part of Tamaulipas): Calle Allende 3330, col. Jardin, telephone (011)(52)(867) 714-0512.
      • Tijuana (Baja California Norte and Baja California Sur): Paseo de Las Culturas s/n Mesa de Otay, telephone (011) (52) (664) 977-2000.

      All other Mexican states, the Federal District of Mexico City, and the city of Tampico, Tamaulipas, are part of the Embassy's consular district.

      Consular Agencies:

      • Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14, telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.
      • Cancún: Blvd. Kukulcan Km 13 ZH Torre La Europea, Despacho 301 Cancun, Quintana Roo, Mexico C.P. 77500; telephone (011)(52)(998) 883-0272.
      • Cozumel: Plaza Villa Mar en el Centro, Plaza Principal, (Parque Juárez between Melgar and 5th Ave.) 2nd floor, locales #8 and 9, telephone (011)(52)(987) 872-4574 or, 202-459-4661 (a U.S. number).
      • Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa, telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.
      • Los Cabos: Las Tiendas de Palmilla Local B221, Carretera Transpeninsular Km. 27.5, San José del Cabo, BCS, Mexico 23406 Telephone: (624) 143-3566 Fax: (624) 143-6750.
      • Mazatlán: Playa Gaviotas #202, Zona Dorada, telephone (011)(52)(669) 916-5889.
      • Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcalá no. 407, interior 20, telephone (011)(52)(951) 514-3054, (011) (52)(951) 516-2853.
      • Piedras Negras: Abasolo #211, Zona Centro, Piedras Negras, Coah., Tel. (011)(52)(878) 782-5586.
      • Playa del Carmen: "The Palapa," Calle 1 Sur, between Avenida 15 and Avenida 20, telephone (011)(52)(984) 873-0303 or 202-370-6708(a U.S. number).
      • Puerto Vallarta: Paradise Plaza, Paseo de los Cocoteros #1, Local #4, Interior #17, Nuevo Vallarta, Nayarit, telephone (011)(52)(322) 222-0069.
      • San Luis Potosí: Edificio "Las Terrazas", Avenida Venustiano Carranza 2076-41, Col. Polanco, telephone: (011)(52)(444) 811-7802/7803.
      • San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.
  • Actividad Volcánica Actual del Popocatépetl, Julio 2013

    Actividad Volcánica Actual del Popocatépetl, Julio 2013

    • Message for U.S. Citizens - Update on Popocatepetl Volcano Activity and Emergency Preparedness 

      On July 6, 2013 the Centro Nacional de Prevención de Desastres (CENAPRED) announced that the alert level for Popocatepetl Volcano is now Yellow Alert, phase 3, which is the fifth of seven possible levels. Some flights between Mexico and the US have been disrupted, so please check with individual airlines for the latest updates. 

      The volcano lies around 70km (40 miles) southeast of Mexico City.  CENAPRED has also stated that recent changes in the volcano’s activity could be indicators of increased likelihood of expulsion of ash.  Please review the CENAPRED website for updates: http://www.cenapred.gob.mx/es/ (Spanish) or http://www.cenapred.unam.mx/cgi-bin/popo/reportes/ultrepi2.cgi (English).  

      Per the CENAPRED announcement, activity is prohibited within a 12 kilometer radius from the volcano.  If you travel to other areas around Popocatepetl, you should familiarize yourself with evacuation plans, monitor news outlets, use good judgment, and take all appropriate safety measures as volcanic conditions—as well as wind direction—can change rapidly.    

      Please monitor local, national and international news media (print, radio, and television) for updates and to take appropriate measures to ensure personal safety and well-being during the heightened alert.

      The State Department and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have very helpful guides for disaster preparedness available to you on-line at: www.travel.state.gov and at http://www.fema.gov/plan.  The National Geographic website also has useful information on preparedness for volcano activity at http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/volcano-safety-tips/.  We urge everyone to review the disaster preparedness materials available on-line to be better informed and better prepared for potential emergencies arising from the increased volcanic activity.

      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov.  The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

      Area consular agencies include:

      Acapulco:
      Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300. 

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo:
      Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100. 

      Oaxaca:
      Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende:
      Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website at http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/citizen_services/consular-district-map.html

  • Comienzo de la Temporada de Huracanes- 31 de mayo del 2013

    Comienzo de la Temporada de Huracanes- 31 de mayo del 2013

    • The U.S. Department of State has issued a travel alert regarding the upcoming Hurricane Season in the Atlantic, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins June 1 and ends November 30.   Please read the full text of the alert at http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_5980.html.  

      U.S. citizens planning to visit locations that are vulnerable to hurricanes should be aware of the chance of storms and make a plan in case of emergency.  Even inland areas far from the coast can experience destructive winds, tornadoes, and floods from tropical storms and hurricanes. 

      Please check your passport and those of your family members to assure that they are still valid. As you may need to travel to the United States (or elsewhere) on short notice, it is important to have valid travel documents so that your trip is not unnecessarily delayed.  If you plan to travel to the United States, please also ensure that any non-U.S. citizen family members also have valid Lawful Permanent Resident cards or U.S. visas or visit our website at http://www.travel.state.gov/  for more information on applying for a visa.   

      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.  

      Area consular agencies include:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.  

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.  

      We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Mexico enroll in the Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at www.Travel.State.GovSTEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency.  If you don’t have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. 

      Regularly monitor the State Department's website, where you can find current Travel Warnings, (including the Travel Warning for Mexico), Travel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution.  Read the Country Specific Information for Mexico.  For additional information, refer to “A Safe Trip Abroad” on the State Department’s website. 

      Contact the U.S. embassy or consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions.  You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).  Follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and download our free Smart Traveler iPhone App to have travel information at your fingertips.

  • Mensaje de Seguridad-Mayo 2013

    Mensaje de Seguridad-Mayo 2013

    • Security Message for U.S. Citizens – Reminder of the Security Situation in Michoacan

      Western Michoacan has experienced a rise in conflict between transnational criminal organizations and civilian self-defense groups (autodefensas) that has led to a disruption in travel and communication in the area and violent incidents.  Elements of the Mexican military and Federal police have recently been deployed by the Mexican federal government in an effort to restore order.  Some areas have accepted the introduction of these forces; in others there have been confrontations.  The security situation remains fluid and the possibility of increased violence exists


      The Embassy wishes to remind U.S. citizens of the most recent Travel Warning issued by the Department of State on November 20, 2012, which recommends that they defer all non-essential travel to the State of Michoacan with the exception of Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas, where they should exercise caution. 

      As discussed in the U.S. Department of State Travel Warning for Mexico and the Country Specific Information for Mexico, crime can occur anywhere in Mexico and can often be violent.

      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

      Area consular agencies include:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

      We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Mexico enroll in the Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at www.Travel.State.GovSTEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency.  If you don’t have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. 

      Regularly monitor the State Department's website, where you can find current Travel Warnings, (including the Travel Warning for Mexico), Travel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution.  Read the Country Specific Information for (Name of Country).  For additional information, refer to “A Safe Trip Abroad” on the State Department’s website

      Contact the U.S. embassy or consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions.  You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).  Follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and download our free Smart Traveler iPhone App to have travel information at your fingertips.

  • Actualización del Popocatépetl, Mayo del 2013

    Actualización del Popocatépetl, Mayo del 2013

    • The Centro Nacional de Prevención de Desastres (CENAPRED) has announced that the alert level for Popocatepetl Volcano is Yellow Alert, phase 3, which is the fifth of seven possible levels.  The volcano lies around 70km (40 miles) southeast of Mexico City.  CENAPRED has also stated that recent changes in the volcano’s activity could be indicators of increased likelihood of expulsion of ash.  Please review the CENAPRED website at http://www.cenapred.gob.mx/es/ for updates.  

      Per the CENAPRED announcement, activity is prohibited within a 12 kilometer radius from the volcano.  If you travel to other areas around Popocatepetl, you should familiarize yourself with evacuation plans, monitor news outlets, use good judgment, and take all appropriate safety measures as volcanic conditions—as well as wind direction—can change rapidly.   

      Please monitor local, national and international news media (print, radio, and television) for updates and to take appropriate measures to ensure their personal safety and well-being during the heightened alert.   

      The State Department and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have very helpful guides for disaster preparedness available to you on-line at: www.travel.state.gov and at http://www.fema.gov/plan.  The National Geographic website also has useful information on preparedness for volcano activity at 

      http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/volcano-safety-tips/.  We urge everyone to review the disaster preparedness materials available on-line to be better informed and better prepared for potential emergencies arising from the increased volcanic activity.


      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov.  The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.  

      Area consular agencies include: 

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.  

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.  

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.  

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.  

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

  • Mensaje de Seguridad, 27 de marzo del 2013

    Mensaje de Seguridad, 27 de marzo del 2013

    • United States Embassy Mexico City, Mexico
      Security Message for U.S. Citizens:  Additional Restrictions on Travel affecting Guerrero, Estado de Mexico, and Northwestern Morelos

      March 27, 2013


      Due to recent criminal activity, the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City has incrementally amended its guidance on official travel in certain areas.  The following information reflects those incremental changes and supplements the information found in the U.S. Department of State Travel Warning for Mexico and the Country Specific Information for Mexico

      • In Acapulco, the Embassy suggests that U.S. citizens defer non-essential travel to areas further than two blocks inland of the Costera Miguel Aleman Boulevard, which runs parallel to popular beach areas.  Lodging should be limited to the “Hotel Zone” of Acapulco, beginning from the Hotel Avalon Excalibur Acapulco in the north and going south through Puerto Marquez including the Playa Diamante area.  In general, the Playa Diamante area, just south of Acapulco Bay, has been less affected by violence and criminal activity.  Any activity outside the Hotel Zone should be limited to the coastal area from La Quebrada to the beginning of the Hotel Zone and only during daylight hours.  Flying to/from Acapulco is the preferred method of travel.  If traveling by automobile, U.S. citizens should exercise caution and limit travel to the Highway 95D toll road, staying on the toll road towards the Playa Diamante area and avoiding the highway running through the city of Acapulco.
      • The Embassy also suggests that U.S. citizens defer non-essential travel between Acapulco and Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa.  (This is a change from the Travel Warning which previously stated travel on Highway 200 during daylight hours only.)  Traveling to/from Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa by air is recommended, and U.S. citizens should exercise caution while in the cities of Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa.
      • The Embassy suggests that U.S. citizens defer non-essential travel on any roads between Huitzilac, Morelos and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas. 
      • The Embassy has also amended its restrictions on travel to seven municipalities (Coacalco, Ecatepec, Nezahualcoyotl, La Paz, Valle del Chalco Solidaridad, Chalco, and Ixtapaluca) in the Estado de Mexico.  The Embassy suggests that U.S. citizens defer non-essential travel to these municipalities unless traveling on the main thoroughfares through these seven municipalities.

      As discussed in the U.S. Department of State Travel Warning for Mexico and the Country Specific Information for Mexico, crime can occur anywhere in Mexico and can often be violent.  Review your personal security plans; remain aware of your surroundings, including local events; and monitor local news stations for updates.  Maintain a high level of vigilance and take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security and follow instructions of local authorities. 

      We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Mexico enroll in the Department of State's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at
      https://step.state.gov/step.  STEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency.  If you don't have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

      Regularly monitor the State Department's website at http://travel.state.gov, where you can find other current Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution.  For additional information, refer to "A Safe Trip Abroad" on the State Department's website. 

      Contact the U.S. embassy or consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions.  You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free from within the United States and Canada, or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). Follow us on Twitter at https://mobile.twitter.com/travelgov and Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/travelgov, and download our free Smart Traveler iPhone App at https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/smart-traveler/id442693988?mt=8 to have travel information at your fingertips.


      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov.  The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.  

      Area consular agencies include: 

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.  

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.  

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.  

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

       

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.

  • Mensaje de Seguridad-Aca-HWY 200-EDOMEX Marzo del 2013

    Mensaje de Seguridad-Aca-HWY 200-EDOMEX Marzo del 2013

    • Due to recent criminal activity, the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City has incrementally amended its guidance on official travel in certain areas.  The following information reflects those incremental changes and supplements the information found in the U.S. Department of State Travel Warning for Mexico and the Country Specific Information for Mexico

      • In Acapulco, the Embassy suggests that U.S. citizens defer non-essential travel to areas further than two blocks inland of the Costera Miguel Aleman Boulevard, which runs parallel to popular beach areas.  Lodging should be limited to the “Hotel Zone” of Acapulco, beginning from the Hotel Avalon Excalibur Acapulco in the north and going south through Puerto Marquez including the Playa Diamante area.  In general, the Playa Diamante area, just south of Acapulco Bay, has been less affected by violence and criminal activity.  Any activity outside the Hotel Zone should be limited to the coastal area from La Quebrada to the beginning of the Hotel Zone and only during daylight hours.  Flying to/from Acapulco is the preferred method of travel.  If traveling by automobile, U.S. citizens should exercise caution and limit travel to the Highway 95D toll road, staying on the toll road towards the Playa Diamante area and avoiding the highway running through the city of Acapulco.
      • The Embassy also suggests that U.S. citizens defer non-essential travel between Acapulco and Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa.  (This is a change from the Travel Warning which previously stated travel on Highway 200 during daylight hours only.)  Traveling to/from Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa by air is recommended, and U.S. citizens should exercise caution while in the cities of Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa.
      • The Embassy suggests that U.S. citizens defer non-essential travel on any roads between Huitzilac, Morelos and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas. 
      • The Embassy has also amended its restrictions on travel to seven municipalities (Coacalco, Ecatepec, Nezahualcoyotl, La Paz, Valle del Chalco Solidaridad, Chalco, and Ixtapaluca) in the Estado de Mexico.  The Embassy suggests that U.S. citizens defer non-essential travel to these municipalities unless traveling on the main thoroughfares through these seven municipalities.  

      As discussed in the U.S. Department of State Travel Warning for Mexico and the Country Specific Information for Mexico, crime can occur anywhere in Mexico and can often be violent.  Review your personal security plans; remain aware of your surroundings, including local events; and monitor local news stations for updates.  Maintain a high level of vigilance and take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security and follow instructions of local authorities. 

      We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Mexico enroll in the Department of State's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at
      https://step.state.gov/step.  STEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency.  If you don't have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

      Regularly monitor the State Department's website at http://travel.state.gov, where you can find other current Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution.  For additional information, refer to "A Safe Trip Abroad" on the State Department's website. 

      Contact the U.S. embassy or consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions.  You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free from within the United States and Canada, or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). Follow us on Twitter at https://mobile.twitter.com/travelgov and Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/travelgov, and download our free Smart Traveler iPhone App at https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/smart-traveler/id442693988?mt=8 to have travel information at your fingertips.


      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov.  The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.  

      Area consular agencies include: 

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300. 

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.  

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.  

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.  

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

  • Aviso Importante para Viaje de Menores

    Aviso Importante para Viaje de Menores

    • IMPORTANT NOTE FOR TRAVEL OF MINORS 

      On January 31, 2013, the Mexican National Immigration Institute announced the Regulations of the Mexican Migration Law relating to the travel of minors were being suspended until January 24, 2014 (http://www.inm.gob.mx/index.php/page/Noticia_310113).  The regulations would have required international air and sea carriers to verify that all minors (under 18 years of age) traveling alone or accompanied by a third party of legal age (grandparent, uncle/aunt, school group) possess a notarized document showing the consent of both parents or those with parental authority or legal guardianship, in addition to a passport, before entering or leaving Mexico.  The implementation of these regulations will now be delayed.

      The Embassy would like remind U.S. Citizens that Mexican law still allows Mexican authorities (e.g. Mexican immigration authorities) to require that any non-Mexican citizen under the age of 18 departing Mexico to provide written permission from any parent or guardian not traveling with the child to or from Mexico.

      The State Department recommends that the permission should include travel dates, destinations, airlines and a brief summary of the circumstances surrounding the travel. The State Department also recommends that the child carry the original letter – not a facsimile or scanned copy – as well as proof of the parent/child relationship (usually a birth certificate or court document such as a custody decree, if applicable). Travelers should contact the Mexican Embassy or the nearest Mexican consulate for current information.

  • Alerta de Viaje a México- 20 de noviembre del 2013

    Alerta de Viaje a México- 20 de noviembre del 2013

    • The Department of State has issued this Travel Warning to inform U.S. citizens about the security situation in Mexico.  General information on the overall security situation is provided immediately below.  For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.
      This Travel Warning supersedes the Travel Warning for Mexico dated February 8, 2012 to consolidate and update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

      Please read full report here

  • Precaución Global-febrero del 2013

    Precaución Global-febrero del 2013

  • Última oportunidad para regresar boletas para elecciones del 6 de noviembre- 24 de octubre del 2012

    Última oportunidad para regresar boletas para elecciones del 6 de noviembre- 24 de octubre del 2012

    • Embassies and consulates are not polling places. The majority of states require voted ballots to reach local election officials by the close of polls on Tuesday, November 6.  U.S. citizens who want to participate in the 2012 U.S. elections should already have returned their absentee ballots to their local election officials. U.S. embassies and consulates are not polling places; same-day in-person voting is not available outside the United States.

      Ballot not yet sent to local election officials?  All voters who wish to participate in this election who have not yet sent their ballots to their local election officials should consider returning their ballot to the United States via an express courier service such as FedEx, UPS, or DHL.  Some states or counties may allow you to return your voted ballot electronically. Check your state’s voting procedures at FVAP website for guidance.

      Returning your Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot by email or fax. The following states allow voters to use email or fax to send signed, voted Federal Write-in Absentee Ballots to local election officials: Arizona, California (fax only), Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. Check your state's voting procedures at FVAP website for guidance.

      Returning ballots via express courier service.  Voters can hire express courier companies such as UPS, DHL, and FedEx to return voted ballots.  Through October 31, FedEx is offering discounted shipping for last-minute voters in 94 countries through the Express Your Vote program. Ballots sent to local election officials via express courier service do not receive standard postmarks, so voters using this method should confirm delivery on or before November 6 prior to payment and shipment.

      Returning your ballot by mail. Ballots sent via mail at this late date are unlikely to reach local election officials by state ballot receipt deadlines.  If you still wish to send your voted ballot via mail, place your voted ballot in a U.S. postage-paid envelope addressed to your local election officials. Drop it off at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City or one of the nine U.S. Consulates throughout Mexico, and we'll send it back home for you without the need to pay international postage. If you can't visit the Embassy or consulate in person, ask a friend or colleague drop it off for you.  You are advised to use the Embassy/consulate to mail materials only if dropped at our locations at least 7 days before the state's postmark deadline (allow extra time if the deadline is based on receipt not postmark). Due to the longer transit time (2-3 weeks), we no longer recommend dropping voting materials at the many U.S. consular agencies in Mexico. But any materials dropped at the Embassy, consulates, and consular agencies, will be forwarded in the diplomatic mail system since only the state election officials—not personnel in the Embassy or consulates—determine if it is timely. If using international commercial mail (as noted above this option is highly recommend if your state does not allow electronic return of the ballot) also be sure to allow sufficient time for international mail delivery.
       
      Have Questions? Please contact a Voting Assistance Officer in the American Citizen Services Unit of U.S. Embassy Mexico City at ACSMexicoCity@state.gov or (55) 5080-2000 (dial 0 to ask for ACS regarding Voting Assistance).

      Confirm your registration and ballot delivery online.  Learn more at the Federal Voting Assistance Program's (FVAP) website.

  • Prepárese para los Viajes por las Fiestas y Revise ahora la validez de su Pasaporte

    Prepárese para los Viajes por las Fiestas y Revise ahora la validez de su Pasaporte


    • ¿Planea viajar durante las festividades de Acción de Gracias,  Navidad o Año Nuevo?

      ¡Tome un momento para verificar la vigencia de su pasaporte y asegurarse que no expire antes de Año Nuevo!

      Las citas disponibles para  pasaporte, renovaciones, paginas adicionales
      y Reporte Consular de Nacimiento pueden agotarse rapidamente durante las temporadas festivas. En caso de requerir cualquiera de estos servicios, favor de visitar la pagina de Pasaportes y Ciudadania de nuestra web para conocer los requisitos y agendar una cita.

      NOTE: If you did not receive this message directly from ACSMexicoCity@state.gov, you are not enrolled with the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City with your current email address and should re-enroll in the Smart Travelers Enrollment Program (STEP).

  • Completar y Entregar Boleta de Voto en Ausencia

    Completar y Entregar Boleta de Voto en Ausencia

    • Boletas de voto en ausencia que ya han sido entregadas a votantes en el extranjero. Cada ciudadano americano que haya solicitada una boleta de voto en ausencia y escogido la opción de entrega por fax o correo electrónico debería tenerla ya en sus manos. Por favor vote y siga los pasos para regresar su boleta completa lo antes posible para que su voto pueda ser contado. Instrucciones a continuación.

      Entregar Boleta por Correo. Ponga su boleta completa en un sobre pagado del servicio de correos de EE.UU. con la dirección de su representante electoral local. Entréguelo en la Embajada de EE.UU. o en alguna de las Agencias Consulares y nosotros lo enviaremos sin que usted tenga que pagar por la tarifa de envío internacional. Si usted no puede visitar alguno de estos sitios en persona, pídale a un amigo o colega que lo entregue por usted. Si a usted le es más fácil utilizar un servicio de mensajería comercial, asegúrese de hacerlo con suficiente tiempo para entregas internacionales. Si el tiempo es limitado utilice un servicio de mensajería privado (FedEx,UPS o DHL) para entregar su boleta antes de la fecha límite de su estado.

      Debido al tiempo de tránsito y los retrasos al entrar a los Estados Unidos le recomendamos que cualquier material a ser enviado a través de la Embajada sea entregado ahí mismo dos semanas antes de la fecha límite de su lugar de votación. Si entrego su material de votación en las agencias consulares de Acapulco, Ixtapa, Oaxaca o San Miguel de Allende, le pedimos que haga esta entrega al menos 3 semanas antes de la fecha límite de su lugar de votación.

      Entregar su boleta por correo electrónico, fax o por internet. Algunos estados permiten estas opciones, pero también puede que le soliciten enviar su boleta de papel firmada. Para mayor información visite el sitio web del Programa de Asistencia al Votante http://www.fvap.gov/

      ¿Aún no recibe su boleta? Use una boleta de emergencia. Los ciudadanos americanos que pidieron una boleta para voto en ausencia y que no la han recibido deben ir a http://www.fvap.gov/ para completar una Boleta Federal de Emergencia. Siga los pasos explicados anteriormente para entregar su boleta. Si después recibe su boleta regular para voto en ausencia, vote y regrésela de inmediato. Los representantes electorales locales solo contaran una boleta por votante, y usaran la boleta regular en caso de que esta haya sido recibida dentro de la fecha límite establecida por el estado.

      ¿Olvidó registrarse o solicitar una boleta de voto por ausencia? Actué de inmediato. Aquí hay tres opciones.

      Opción #1.  Regístrese y solicite una boleta hoy usando la aplicación de solicitud federal tipo tarjeta postal en www.FVAP.gov. Seleccione la opción de envío electrónico de boleta, incluya su dirección de correo electrónico  y envíelo a su representante electoral local. Casi todos los estados permiten entregar la boleta por correo electrónico o fax. Una vez que su aplicación está siendo procesada le enviaran su boleta vía fax o por correo electrónico dependiendo de su estado. Vote tan pronto reciba la boleta en blanco. Las fechas límites de registro  varían y pueden presentarse con tanta anticipación como sea necesario, por lo que debe checar constantemente la fecha límite de su estado.

      Opción #2.  Siga las instrucciones en la Opción #1, pero además complete y envíe una Boleta de Voto en Ausencia al mismo tiempo para asegurarse de que su voto sea considerado. Esta opción puede ser la más conveniente para los votantes primerizos si su estado requiere que usted entregue su Solicitud Federal Tipo Tarjeta Postal por correo. Vote y entregue su  boleta de Voto en Ausencia  cuando llegue. Su representante electoral local  contara solo una boleta por votante, y utilizaran la boleta regular si esta es recibida dentro de la fecha límite.

      Opción #3. Votantes de los siguientes estados pueden usar la Boleta de Ausencia Federal en Blanco de manera combinada con la forma de registro del votante, solicitud de Boleta de Voto en Ausencia y la Boleta de Voto de Ausencia: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Distrito de Columbia, Georgia, Hawái, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, Nuevo México, Carolina del Norte, Dakota del Norte, Ohio, Oklahoma, Carolina del Sur, Dakota del Sur, Tennessee, Virginia, y Washington.(AVISO: Esta forma debe de llegar a su representante electoral local dentro de la fecha límite establecida por su estado o la fecha límite para registro de votantes, cualquiera que suceda primero). 

      Entregar por Correo su Boleta de Ausencia Federal en Blanco. Siga los pasos indicados  en las opciones anteriores para entregar su boleta por correo.

      Entregar por Fax o Correo Electrónico su Boleta de Ausencia Federal en Blanco. Los siguientes estados permiten a sus votantes entregar por correo electrónico o fax  su Boleta de Ausencia Federal en Blanco firmada a los representantes electorales locales: Arizona, California (solo por fax), Colorado, Delaware, Distrito de Columbia, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, Carolina del Norte, Dakota del Norte, Oklahoma, Carolina del Sur, Utah, Washington y Virginia del Oeste. (AVISO: consulte las instrucciones para enviar su boleta por correo electrónico o fax en www.FVAP.gov.)

      ¿Aún tiene Peguntas? Por favor contacte a un Oficial Asistente de Votaciones en la Unidad de Servicios a Ciudadanos Americanos de la Embajada de EE.UU. en la Ciudad de México ACSMexicoCity@state.gov o al  (55) 5080-2000 (marque 0 para preguntar por la asistencia para votar de SCA).

      Confirme su registro y entrega de boleta en línea. Conozca más acerca del Programa Federal de Asistencia al Votante en  www.FVAP.gov.

  • Agencias Consulares- Cambios en la Entrega de Pasaportes

    Agencias Consulares- Cambios en la Entrega de Pasaportes

    • The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City announces that U.S. citizens applying for passports at the U.S. Consular Agencies in Acapulco, Ixtapa, Oaxaca and San Miguel de Allende on or after October 15, 2012, will no longer retrieve their passports at the agencies.

      U.S. citizens applying on or after that date will pay a courier service for delivery of the passport from Mexico City to their home or the courier company’s nearest office.

      This change will provide better customer service to our U.S. citizens.  Additionally, the change will bring applications from the four consular agencies into line with the current practice for citizens who submit their applications at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City and other U.S. embassies and consulates. 

      The U.S. Embassy Mexico City’s current agreement for this courier service is with Pegaso Express. Passport delivery service within the Mexico City metropolitan area costs MP$80; outside of Mexico City the cost is MP$135. As mentioned, U.S. passport applicants will be required to pay for the delivery of their passport to their location from Mexico City (not the United States where the passport is produced). 

      The Embassy also recommends that U.S. citizens with travel in the near future (e.g., Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc.) review their passport needs.  If you need a new passport or need to renew a passport, we suggest you make an appointment or apply with sufficient time before your travel. Note that adult citizens renewing their passports might not need an appointment. For more information on the requirements to apply for a passport as well as how to make an appointment, please visit the General Passport Information page in our website.

      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000. You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov or check the Embassy's website. 

      Area consular agencies’ location and contact information is:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

  • Tiempo límite para Voto Extranjero en Ausencia

    Tiempo límite para Voto Extranjero en Ausencia

    • Crunch Time for U.S. Overseas/Absentee Voting

      If you have already registered to vote in the U.S., have received your ballot, and have returned it, you can ignore the rest of this email. But first PLEASE forward this email to overseas U.S. citizen friends who may not be enrolled* to receive these emails from the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City. 

      As discussed extensively at http://www.fvap.gov, which is the one-stop website for every issue related to voting by overseas U.S. voters, there are two basic steps for an overseas/absentee voter:

      1) Register to vote and request an absentee ballot:  Both tasks can be accomplished by completing the Federal Post Card Application or FPCA and mailing to the listed election official in your U.S. state of residence using the postage-paid envelopes (or review your state's other methods of receiving this form—some will receive by email or fax)

      2) Return your completed absentee ballot.  If you completed step #1 above, you should be receiving a ballot specific to your voting district either by mail, email, or fax.  If you have not received your ballot by the first week in October, we suggest that you contact the election officials in your district to inquire on the status (see extensive contact information for your state on www.FVAP.gov)

      IF AN ABSENTEE BALLOT IS NOT RECEIVED, the American citizen may choose to use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB) The following is more guidance from FVAP’s FAQs on use of the FWAB.

      When should I receive my ballot? What happens if I do not receive a ballot from my local election office?

      States and territories begin mailing ballots at least 45 days before an election.

      If you have not received your ballot one month before the election:

      - Go to www.FVAP.gov and see what online ballot delivery tools are available for your state.

      - Use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB)wizard available at FVAP.gov to complete a back-up ballot and submit it to your local election official.

      - Contact your local election official to determine the status of your ballot. Contact information is available at FVAP.gov.

      - When you receive your regular absentee ballot, complete it and return it regardless of when you receive it. Your local election official will ensure that only one of the ballots is counted.  All FWABs must be completed, printed, signed, dated, and submitted to your local election official. Check out your state's instructions to determine your state specific instructions, witness requirements for voted ballots, deadlines, and mailing addresses.

      If you have requested an absentee ballot from your State but have not received it, you can also vote by using the back-up Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB). You may submit the FWAB at any time after you submit your FPCA.

      In order to be eligible to use this back-up ballot, you must:

      - Be absent from your voting residence;

      - Have applied for a regular ballot early enough so the request is received by the appropriate local election official not later than the State deadline or the date that is 30 days before the general election; AND

      - Have not received the requested regular absentee ballot from the State.

      - Regarding MAILING, the Embassy can accept for mailing all materials that are clearly for voting-related purposes (e.g. addressed to a local election official) and which either use the postage-paid envelope template or have US postage affixed.  You can’t go wrong using the provided envelope template (which you can print out on a blank envelope or attach the pertinent information on to an envelope).

      Because of transit time and delays in entering the U.S. we recommend that any materials mailed through the Embassy are received by the Embassy at least 2 weeks before the local deadline.  If you drop off your voting material at the consular agencies in Acapulco, Ixtapa, Oaxaca or San Miguel de Allende, we ask that the voting material be received by the Agency at least 3 weeks before the U.S. local deadline.

      This will allow time for the materials to arrive in the U.S. on time. 
      Americans can also mail their materials directly to local election officials in the U.S. through international mail but must be careful to provide sufficient postage.

      If you have any questions, please write to us at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov.

      * If you did not receive this message directly from ACSMexicoCity@state.gov, you are not enrolled with the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City with your current email address and should re-enroll in the Smart Travelers Enrollment Program (STEP).

  • Balacera en Tres Marías- 24 de agosto del 2013

    Balacera en Tres Marías- 24 de agosto del 2013

    • At approximately 8 a.m. August 24, two U.S. government employees traveling south of Mexico City in an armored embassy vehicle were attacked by gunfire on a local road in the vicinity of Tres Marias, Morelos.  The Government of Mexico has acknowledged that elements of the Federal Police fired on the embassy vehicle and an investigation is ongoing.

       

      American citizens in this area should maintain a heightened sense of alert while the Mexican government investigation into this incident continues.  Americans in this area should also monitor local news and information to stay informed about situations that could affect their security. 

       

      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: http://us.mg5.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=ACSMexicoCity@state.gov The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

       

      Area consular agencies include:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

  • Huracán Ernesto- 8 de agosto del 2012

    Huracán Ernesto- 8 de agosto del 2012

    • This message is being issued to alert U.S. citizens residing and traveling in Mexico that the National Hurricane Center (NHC) states that Hurricane Ernesto, though presently weakening over the Yucatan peninsula, could strengthen over the Gulf of Mexico (Bay of Campeche) and make landfall in Veracruz on Thursday with hurricane force winds.  The NHC has issued a hurricane warning for the coast of Mexico from Barra de Nautlato to Coatzacoalos in the state of Veracruz, with tropical storm warning for other parts of Mexico’s Gulf Coast.  In addition to danger from wind, flash floods and mudslides are possible. Coastal areas are especially vulnerable to these hazards. Please visit the National Hurricane Center’s website http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/ to follow the storm’s path.

      The U.S. Embassy will continue to monitor Hurricane Ernesto and will issue updated messages as necessary. U.S. citizens are urged to locate shelter, monitor media reports, and follow all official instructions. U.S. citizens should carry their travel documents at all times (i.e. U.S. passport, birth certificate, picture ID’s, etc.) or secure them in safe, waterproof locations. We also suggest that U.S. citizens contact friends and family in the United States with updates about their whereabouts.

      Additional information on this year’s hurricane season can be found at “Travel Alert – Hurricane Season” at http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_5727.html.    Information on hurricanes and storm preparedness may be found on our “Hurricane Season-Know Before You Go” at http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis_pa_tw_2915.html, and on the “Natural Disasters” page at http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/emergencies/emergencies_1207.html.  

      Updated information on travel in Mexico may be obtained from the Department of State by calling 1-888-407-4747 within the United States and Canada, or from overseas, 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 am to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

      Please continue to monitor the Embassy’s website (http://mexico.usembassy.gov/) for updated information.  Please consult the Country Specific Information for Mexico at http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_970.html..    

      For any emergencies involving U.S. citizens, please contact the U.S. Citizens Services Unit of the U.S. Embassy or the nearest U.S. Consular Agency.  The Embassy is located at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuautehmoc, Mexico City; telephone from within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000 and from the U.S. 011-52-55-5080-2000; after hours emergency telephone  from Mexico 01-55-5080-2000 extension 0 and from the U.S. 011-52-55-5080-2000 extension 0 and; ACS unit e-mail is acsmexicocity@state.gov; and web page is http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/citizen_services.html

      Consular Agencies within the Embassy’s consular district:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

  • Asaltos en parques y bosques cerca de la Ciudad de México

    Asaltos en parques y bosques cerca de la Ciudad de México

    • On July 13, a church group of approximately 90 youths was attacked in a popular, though secluded hiking area, on the eastern outskirts of Mexico City.  The victims were beaten, robbed, and some female minors were raped during the incident.  A similar robbery and rape attack occurred in February 2012 in the same region.  Other high profile criminal incidents have occurred in parks and forests near D.F. over the last few years.

      In response to Friday’s events, the Mexican Government has increased police vigilance and security measures available to protect parks and camping areas.  Seventeen individuals have been arrested in association with the church group attack, with 11 assailants having been fully identified by their victims.  The investigation continues.  

      The Mexican Scouting Association has publically declared the following 11 recreational areas off limits for official scouting activities: La Marquesa, El Ajusco, las faldas del Iztaccíhuatl, San Rafael, Nexcoalango, La Joya, el Cerro El Telapón, La Laguna de Salazar, Llano Grande, las lagunas de Zempoala y Río Frío.

      As discussed in the Travel Warning for Mexico (http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_5665.html) and the Country Specific Information for Mexico (http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_970.html#crime), crime can occur anywhere in Mexico and can often be violent.

      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: http://us.mg5.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=ACSMexicoCity@state.gov The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

      Area consular agencies include:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.

  • Mensaje de Votación del Día de Independencia

    Mensaje de Votación del Día de Independencia

    • A July 4th Voting Reminder

      Happy 4th of July!  U.S. citizens around the globe will soon mark the 236th anniversary of our Nation’s Independence Day with family and community gatherings, food, and fireworks.  For U.S. citizens living outside the United States, the 4th of July is an opportunity for all of us, regardless of political affiliation, to celebrate our shared values as citizens of the United States of America. 

      Have a say in our country’s future.  One of our most treasured values is the right and the privilege to vote – to participate actively in our country’s democratic process.  This November, U.S. citizens will elect a President, a Vice President, one-third of the Senate, and the entire House of Representatives.  The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City encourages all U.S. citizens to participate in this year’s elections, and stands ready to help you vote.   

      Almost all overseas U.S. citizens can vote.  Twenty-two states and the District of Columbia now allow adult children who have never resided in the United States to vote using their parents’ state of voting residence.  Details are available on the FVAP website at http://www.fvap.gov/reference/nvr-res.html

      Register and request a ballot.  To vote, new laws require you to complete and submit a Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) this calendar year.  The FPCA allows you to register to vote and request an absentee ballot.  If you haven’t yet done so, we urge you to do so now.  The easiest way to complete it is online at www.FVAP.gov.  Depending on your State’s rules, you then send it to your local election officials electronically or by mail.

      Mailing guidance.  Print out the completed FPCA and the (U.S.) postage-paid envelope containing the address of your local election officials.  You can drop off the postage-paid envelope (containing your FPCA) at the Embassy, and we will mail it back home for you without the need to pay international postage.  If it’s easier for you to use Mexico’s postal system, be sure to affix sufficient international postage and allow sufficient time for international mail delivery. 

      If you would like to mail your forms and ballots to the United States through the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, you may drop them off with us during regular business hours (8:30am – 4:30pm).  Our address is Paseo de la Reforma 305, Col. Cuauhtémoc, Mexico D.F..  If you are in Guanajuato, Guerrero or Oaxaca you can also drop off your forms and ballots in person at the consular agencies in San Miguel de Allende, Ixtapa, Acapulco, or Oaxaca.  You can find the address and contact information of these agencies here.  In each case, please allow plenty of time for delivery as mail sent by us to the United States must first be sent to Texas where it is then deposited as standard U.S. mail.  If you are dropping off your forms or ballots at the Embassy, please do so at least two weeks before the deadline.  If dropping of your forms or ballots at one of the four consular agencies mentioned above, please do so at least three weeks before the deadline.  U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek assistance from the U.S. consulates or consular agencies located throughout the country.  Click on the following to find a directory of the consulates and consular agencies

      Make your vote count!  Follow your State’s absentee voting procedures carefully.  Send in your FPCA before the registration deadline.   When you get your ballot, vote and mail it promptly so it reaches local election officials by your State’s absentee ballot receipt deadline.

  • Huracán Carlota- 15 de junio del 2012

    Huracán Carlota- 15 de junio del 2012

    • This emergency message is being issued to alert U.S. citizens residing and traveling in Mexico that the National Hurricane Center (NHC - www.nhc.noaa.gov) has issued a warning for Hurricane Carlotta, which is currently located in the Pacific Ocean south of Oaxaca.

      The National Hurricane Center reports that Hurricane Carlotta is a Category 1 hurricane and is moving toward the northwest.  The center of Carlotta should move near or over the coast of southern Mexico late tonight and Saturday.  A hurricane warning is in effect for the Pacific Coast of Mexico from Punta Maldonado in southern Guerrero state to Acapulco, Guerrero; a hurricane watch is in effect for the Pacific Coast of Mexico west of Acapulco to Tecpan de Galeana, Guerrero.  More information from NHC can be obtained at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/index.shtml?#CARLOTTA.  

      The U.S. Embassy will continue to monitor Hurricane Carlotta’s track, and will issue updated messages as needed. U.S. citizens are urged to locate shelter, monitor media reports, and follow all official instructions. U.S. citizens should carry their travel documents at all time (i.e. U.S. Passport, Birth Certificate, picture ID’s, etc.) or secure them in safe, waterproof locations. We also suggest that U.S. citizens contact friends and family in the United States with updates about their whereabouts.

      Additional information on hurricanes and storm preparedness may be found on our “Hurricane Season-Know Before You Go” webpage, and on the “Natural Disasters” page of the Bureau of Consular Affairs website.  Updated information on travel in the Mexico may be obtained from the Department of State by calling 1-888-407-4747 within the United States and Canada, or from overseas, 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 am to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

      Please continue to monitor the Embassy’s website for updated information.  Please consult the Country Specific Information for Mexico, available on the Bureau of Consular Affairs website.   

      For any emergencies involving U.S. citizens, please contact the U.S. Citizens Services Unit of the U.S. Embassy’s Consular Section, located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

      Area consular agencies include:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

  • Posibilidad de Revancha a raíz de arrestos de TCO

    Posibilidad de Revancha a raíz de arrestos de TCO

    • The U.S. Embassy alerts U.S. citizens traveling and residing in Mexico to the enhanced potential for violence related to today’s arrests of Transnational Criminal Organization (TCO) associates and family members residing in the United States.

      This morning, U.S. federal law enforcement agents arrested associates and family members of a senior TCO member, and seized property and assets within the United States.  These arrests could result in some form of retaliation and/or anti-American violence. Given the history and resources of this violent TCO, the U.S. Embassy urges U.S. citizens to maintain a low profile and a heightened sense of awareness.  

      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

      Area consular agencies include:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.

  • Operaciones Normales tras Sismo

    Operaciones Normales tras Sismo

    • Despite a brief evacuation immediately following the earthquake and aftershocks, the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City and its Consular Agencies in Acapulco, Ixtapa, Oaxaca and San Miguel de Allende are all operating as normal.  Any Americans needing assistance should contact the nearest facility using the information below

      The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000.  You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/

      Area consular agencies include:

      Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14; telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.

      Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa; telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

      Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20; telephone (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853.

      San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

      U.S. citizens in other areas of Mexico should seek the assistance of the U.S. Consulates or Consular agencies located throughout the country. A directory of Consulates and Consular Agencies can be found on the Embassy website http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.

  • Forma para Cumplimiento de Pago de Impuestos en el Extranjero

    Forma para Cumplimiento de Pago de Impuestos en el Extranjero

    • Message From the Internal Revenue Service (IRS):  Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts Reports (FBAR) FILING DEADLINE is June 30, 2012.

      Unlike tax filings which must be postmarked by the due date, the FBAR must be RECEIVED by the Department of Treasury (PO Box 32621, Detroit, MI 48232-0621) on or before the due date. 

      For the FBAR, there are no filing extensions available, and the potential of significant penalties exists for noncompliance with reporting requirements.  There may be confusion about filing the new form required by the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), Form 8938, and/or the Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR), TD F 90-22.1.  Some are required to file both.  

      A comparison chart that summarizes the distinctions between the two forms and provides guidance on who may have to file an FBAR, a Form 8938, or both, can be found at:  http://www.irs.gov/businesses/article/0,,id=255986,00.html

  • Mensaje para Votantes

    Mensaje para Votantes

    • Voting Message

      Please view Ambassador Wayne's voting message to US Citizens living abroad in Mexico.

  • Información Específica por País, México- 21 de junio del 2013

    Información Específica por País, México- 21 de junio del 2013

    • COUNTRY DESCRIPTION: Mexico is a Spanish-speaking country about three times the size of Texas, consisting of 31 states and one federal district. The capital is Mexico City. Mexico has a rapidly developing economy, ranked by the International Monetary Fund as the fourteenth largest in the world. The climate ranges from tropical to arid, and the terrain consists of coastal lowlands, central high plateaus, deserts and mountains of up to 18,000 feet.

      Many cities throughout Mexico are popular tourist destinations for U.S. citizens. Travelers should note that location-specific information contained below is not confined solely to those cities, but can reflect conditions throughout Mexico. Although the majority of visitors to Mexico thoroughly enjoy their stay, a small number experience difficulties and serious inconveniences.

      Please read the Department's full report on Mexico here.  

  • Alerta Global- 24 de enero del 2013

    Alerta Global- 24 de enero del 2013

    • The Department of State has issued this Worldwide Caution to update information on the continuing threat of terrorist actions and violence against U.S. citizens and interests throughout the world. U.S. citizens are reminded to maintain a high level of vigilance and to take appropriate steps to increase their security awareness. This replaces the Worldwide Caution dated July 26, 2011, to provide updated information on security threats and terrorist activities worldwide.

      Please click here for complete report.